SantaFe

Santa Fe
1. Santa Fe settlers arechurlish types who areaccustomed to live apart from each other, as neither fathers nor sons associate with each other.
The city of Santa Fe was originally occupied by a number of Pueblo Indian villages with founding dates between 1050 to 1150. One of the earliest known settlements in what today is downtown Santa Fe came sometime after 900. A Native American group built a cluster of homes that centered around the site of todays Plaza and spread for half a mile to the south and west; the village was called Ogapoge.The Santa Fe River provided water to people living there. The Santa Fe River is a seasonal waterway which was a year round stream until the 1700s.As of 2007, the river was recognized as the most endangered river in the United States, according to the conservation group American Rivers.
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Santa Fe Opera House
2. The Santa Fe Opera House is a musical theater production hall that brings a wide variety of lyrical opera styles and performers.The striking, stateoftheart, openair theater has won several important design awards and is widely recognized for blending contemporary design aesthetics with traditional building materials. It commands a panorama of breathtaking scenery, with the Jemez Mountains to the west and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the east. Over the years the building has evolved from a 480seat structure built in 1957, with a balcony added several years later to a second built in 1968 after a fire burned the original theater to the ground during the 1967 performance season.The current theatre opened in 1998 with a seating capacity of 2,128 and an additional 106 standing room places. Every seat and standing room position offers an Opera Titles screen a digital computer screen on which instantaneous translations in English and Spanish are broadcast. The combined area of the sweeping stage and mezzanine roofs covers 26,615 square feet with a clerestory joining the two roofs. The shape of the sound inspired the roof concept. Its curves directly follow the acoustic reflections of sound from the stage to the audience. Another advantage of the large roof is its capability to collect rainwater; approximately 60,000 gallons can be stored annually and used to maintain the opera grounds.

In 2001, Stieren Orchestra Hall, a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Stieren, was constructed. The 12,650 square foot, three story building, also designed by Polshek and Partners, provides rehearsal space for the Opera orchestra and serves as the venue for the Prelude Talks which are offered to audience members before most performances. Upper and lower levels contain climatecontrolled storage for the companys costume collection and private rehearsal studios. It has also become a center for the company to host lectures, special events, and recitals, as well as activities by other community arts organizations.The Opera property totals 155 acres; the mesatop portion is home to the Crosby Theater, Stieren Orchestra Hall, and patron parking. The lower grounds, to the northeast are called The Ranch as homage to the San Juan Ranch, a guest resort housed there for many years. The tenacre campus of offices, cantina, swimming pool and an enormous sloping lawn with its mountain views is surrounded by numerous rehearsal halls all nestled into a hillside. Benches scattered among gardens, trees and shrubbery invite artists, crew and apprentices to chat or study or merely pause for a few minutes rest. Swarming with musicians and technicians from May through August, the Opera Ranch also houses the yearround business of an international festival.
The Opera is also acutely aware of its fragile physical environment and has pioneered ways to conserve and protect the landscape. The County of Santa Fe and the Opera are currently constructing a new, stateoftheart water treatment plant. Every year more of the landscaping is redesigned and replanted with droughttolerant plants and shrubs. .....
Lensic Performing Arts Center
3. Owner description We are Santa Fe, N.M.s premier performing arts center located in the historic Lensic Theater in the heart of downtown Santa Fe.Our MissionThe nonprofit Lensic Performing Arts Center enriches lives by bringing diverse art and people together in the historic Lensic Theater, a cornerstone of downtown Santa Fe since 1931. The Lensic presents and supports local and national artists and serves as a center for education, community and youth events through its accessible and affordable programming.The Lensic Theater, located at 211 West San Francisco Street in Santa Fe, New Mexico, is an 821 seat theater designed by Boller Brothers of Kansas City, well known movie theater and vaudeville house architects who designed almost one hundred theaters throughout the West and midWest, including the KiMo Theater in Albuquerque. The pseudoMoorish, Spanish Renaissance Lensic was built by Nathan Salmon and E. John Greer and opened on 24 June 1931. Its name derives from the initials of Greers six grandchildren.The Lensic was completely restored and renovated between 1999 and 2001, and provides Santa Fe and Northern New Mexico with a modern venue for the performing arts.

Like many classic theaters in the US, the Lensic did not escape decline and deterioration. By end of the 1990s, the Lensic was outdated and used only sporadically. From about 1998, the nonprofit Lensic Performing Arts Center began raising money to fund the needed restoration project and, in December 2000, the National Trust for Historic Preservation recognized the Lensic as an official project of Save Americas Treasures.In April 2001, restoration and renovation of the Lensic was completed.A primary goal of the renovation was to provide a superior performance venue for music and dramatic productions. The rear wall was removed to increase the depth of the stage house and the installation of advanced lighting and sound systems allowed the restored Lensic to meet that goal. The unique architectural and ornamental details were painstakingly restored. The total cost of the renovation was approximately $9 million.Today the Lensic is the major performance venue in Santa Fe and is used by the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, the Santa Fe Desert Chorale, the Santa Fe Short Story Festival, the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet and the Santa Fe Concert Association (which sponsors a variety of solo and concert events, as well as its own symphony concerts). In addition, it functions as the location for ballet and lectures, for touring companies, and is still the venue for the screening of classic films on an occasional basis. .....
Santa Fe Bandstand
4. Santa Fe Bandstand is a free 10 week festival on the Plaza in Santa Fe produced by Outside In Productions.The 12th annual season begins on June 23, 2014 and closes on August 28, 2014.
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Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus
5. Owner description Santa Fes professional full sized orchestra with chorus.We focus on orchestra masterpieces that thrill your senses and feed your soul. Our 20122013 season features outstanding gold medalists, first prize winning soloists, and beloved masterworks.The Santa Fe Symphony is Santa Fes professional fullsized orchestra with volunteer chorus. We focus on orchestral masterpieces that thrill your senses and feed your soul. Please join us during our exciting 30th Anniversary Season of performances at the beautiful Lensic, Santa Fes Performing Arts Center, featuring outstanding gold medalists, first prize winning soloists, and beloved masterworks.The Santa Fe Symphony was born on September 2, 1984 at a free concert given at the St. Francis Auditorium in Santa Fe. A group of dedicated musicians and musiclovers, under the leadership of Founder & General Director Gregory W. Heltman, made a bold decision to establish a professional symphony orchestra in Santa Fe. That initial concert included a Rossini overture, Handels Water Music, and Beethovens Symphony No. 2. Donations totaled $1,800, which were later supplemented by further contributions. Thus The Santa Fe Symphony began on a very meager budget, with the musicians contributing their services either for free or a fraction of the customary rate. The Chorus of Santa Fe was founded five years earlier in 1979 and merged with the Symphony in 1986. Choral Director Dr. Linda Raney came on board in 1997.Since then, The Santa Fe Symphony has continued to fulfill its mission to inspire, delight, engage, and enrich audiences of all ages and cultures in Santa Fe, Northern New Mexico and beyond, offering orchestral and choral concerts of the highest professional quality as well as education and outreach programs for adults and school children. Performing a regular subscription series at the 790seat Lensic, Santa Fes Performing Arts Center, The Santa Fe Symphony is recognized as a vital, communityfocused musical organization. It is one of two fully professional, full sized symphony orchestras in the state and is the largest professional symphonic organization in Santa Fe.
Santa Fe and Northern New Mexico are well known for their cultural contributions in the performing and visual arts. Yet many of the youth of our city and the surrounding areas have not had the opportunity to experience this rich culture. The Music Education Committees mission is to involve the talents of our orchestra, chorus members, and contributing music scholars in providing experiential learning opportunities for children as well as adult audiences. .....
Santa Fe Playhouse
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Greer Garson Theater Center
7. The Greer Garson Theatre Centre at Santa Fe University of Art and Design is a respected venue for productions by performing arts students and professional groups. It includes a main theatre with a prosceniumstyle stage, orchestra pit, and seating for 514 people, and the Weckesser Studio Theatre, a multipurpose black box performance space that seats 90. The center is named for Greer Garson, the Academy Award .....
Rockin Rollers Event Arena
8. A fun place for the kids who want to roller skate or roller blade, plus a video arcade, snack bar and specialeffects dance space for a change of pace.This roller rink offers public skating sessions what the owners call family nights on Fridays, as well as lessons and rentals. Theres also a concession area to buy snacks. In line skates are allowed.
Roller skating sessions for the public are one of the main attractions at Rockin Rollers Event Arena. Skating provides great exercise and an opportunity to get out of the house plus, its not like exercising at the gym skating is fun. Laceem up and come join the others. Get on the floor and get ready for a great experience.Remember to tell them that you saw them on RinkTime when you are paying admission at the box office. And remind them to update their schedule on this site.
Are you an adult looking to learn to skate? Do you have children yearning to skate like the pros? If so, the folks here love to teach and their instructors are top notch. For beginners they usually focus on providing the basics. For more advanced skaters they focus on proper form, technique and getting you ready to meet your goals.Why not have your party or event at Rockin Rollers Event Arena? They can make their rink and other facilities available to you for birthday parties, holiday parties or corporate events. Their prices are great. Theyd love to have you out. .....
Theater Grottesco
9. Theater Grottesco has a long history of outreach programs including workshops and master classes for theater professionals, youth, students, the general public and corporations.The company conducts classes internationally, across the United States, throughout New Mexico and locally in Santa Fe. The company has developed a sophisticated post show discussion format with guest artists and experts on specific content material raised in a given show.STORM, a performance event that premiered in February, 2012, is a collaboration between Theater Grottesco, Out of Context and a host of writers, scientists and projection artists. STORM is a journey into the social paradigms that prevent the world from taking action on a myriad of environmental concerns.The twelve piece orchestral, led by conductor J.A. Deane with a series of gestures and signs, creates a real score every night. Ever darkening scientific information, together with network news interpretations, drive the piece through a three movement spoken opera. Two actors portray a chorus of archetypical characters responding to the news and reports. Texts cross cultural and historical barriers. The actors move from character to character, colliding with the information and blending with the emerging music. Rear projected video provides scenography, sometimes in abstraction and at other times creating realistic images with which the characters interact.Technicians make instantaneous projection choices based upon the rhythmic intensity of the unfolding action and sound. Lighting includes stationary bicycles powering lights, candles and torches. Catharsis follows Chaos in a very real reflection of these times.

Formed in Paris in 1983, the company pursues a rigorous artistic path, derived from several of the worlds most highly respected performance conservatories. Many of the members, also trained as anthropologists and environmentalists, inform the content of the all original works. The company has created 12 full length plays and over 40 shorter pieces, toured nationally and internationally and been seen Off Broadway, winning awards in 4 world cities and earning dozens of national, state and city grants.Theater Grottesco is an artists ensemble made up of performers, writers, directors and designers who have been pushing the envelope of theatrical form while celebrating humanity through astonishing and exhilarating performance.

For 30 years, Theater Grottesco has embraced classical theatrical forms while striving to bend and blend these techniques, rhythms, architectures and spirits into something new that can speak to our present time and culture. To create Exquisite Absurdity, pivotal moments within their body of work are assembled, in which successful experiments broke ground and moved the company into new artistic realms; moments that stand up as theatrical events in themselves. Carefully stitched together, this montage provides insight into the evolution of Grottescos work while offering hints of whats to come. .....
Theaterwork Studio
10. This community theater goes out of its way to present refreshing, at times risky, plays.In an intimate space on the south end of town, Theaterwork offers seven main stage productions a year, a broad variety including new plays and classics by regional and national playwrights.Expect to see works by such names as Brecht, Shakespeare, and Victor Hugo.If you dont want to stay at the high priced hotels downtown, this place is great. Located on Cerrillos road, you are close to everything. The hotel rooms are recently remodeled and very clean. You can stayed in a suite which recommend if you plan to be there for more than an overnight.Only wish the pool is outside as the weather is beautiful the whole time. .....
Museum of International Folk Art
11. The Museum of International Folk Art is a state run institution in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. It is one of many cultural institutions operated by the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs.The museum was founded by Florence Dibell Bartlett and opened to the public in 1953 and has gained national and international recognition as the home to the worlds largest collection of internationalfolk art.The collection of more than 135,000 artifacts forms the basis for exhibitions in four distinct wings Bartlett, Girard, Hispanic Heritage, and Neutrogena.The original building, a gift to the state from Bartlett, was designed by famed New Mexico architect John Gaw Meem.The Girard Wing, with its popular exhibition, Multiple Visions: A Common Bond, showcases folk art, popular art, toys and textiles from more than 100 nations. The exhibition is unique in that it was designed by the donor, Alexander Girard, a leading architect and designer. The collection includes toys and dolls, costumes, masks, textiles of all kinds, religious folk art, paintings, beadwork, and more. More than a million visitors have passed through the doors into the special world of Girard since the exhibition opened in 1982. Popular with children and the young at heart, the exhibit attracts visitors back into the museum to find an old favorite, or discover a new treasure in the gallery. Multiple Visions: A Common Bond displays approximately 10% of the collection, the exhibit and collection serve as an inspiration and resource for scholars, artists and educators from around the world, from preschool to college level.The Museums Neutrogena Collection donated by former Neutrogena CEO Lloyd Cotsen in 1995 comprises more than 2,500 textiles, ceramics and carvings from all over the world. The Hispanic Heritage Wing opened in 1988 and, at that time, was the only designated space for Spanish/Hispanic art in the state. This wing underwent renovation and reopened in the fall of 2009, continuing its spotlight on Hispanic folk art from New Mexico and beyond. .....
Loretto Chapel
12. Two mysteries surround the spiral staircase in the Loretto Chapel the identity of its builder and the physics of its construction.The Loretto Chapel in Santa Fe, New Mexico is known for its unusual spiral staircase that is an exceptional work of carpentry.This chapel contains a mysterious spiral staircase built without nails, dowels or any visible support.The construction and builder of the staircase is considered a miracle by the Sisters of Loretto and many who visit it.When the Loretto Chapel was completed in 1878, there was no way to access the choir loft twenty two feet above. Carpenters were called in to address the problem, but they all concluded access to the loft would have to be via ladder as a staircase would interfere with the interior space of the small Chapel.Legend says that to find a solution to the seating problem, the Sisters of the Chapel made a novena to St. Joseph, the patron saint of carpenters. On the ninth and final day of prayer, a man appeared at the Chapel with a donkey and a toolbox looking for work. Months later, the elegant circular staircase was completed, and the carpenter disappeared without pay or thanks. After searching for the man (an ad even ran in the local newspaper) and finding no trace of him, some concluded that he was St. Joseph himself, having come in answer to the sisters prayers.The stairways carpenter, whoever he was, built a magnificent structure. The design was innovative for the time and some of the design considerations still perplex experts today.The staircase has two 360 degree turns and no visible means of support. Also, it is said that the staircase was built without nails only wooden pegs.Questions also surround the number of stair risers relative to the height of the choir loft and about the types of wood and other materials used in the stairways construction.Over the years many have flocked to the Loretto Chapel to see the Miraculous Staircase. The staircase has been the subject of many articles, TV specials, and movies including Unsolved Mysteries and the television movie titled The Staircase.

What makes this chapel different from all others is that the subject of the supposed miracle that took place in it is a staircase.A chapel was constructed somewhere in the 19th century. When it was ready, the nuns found that there was no staircase built to take them to the top level. They spent 9 days praying to St. Joseph, who was a carpenter.On the last day, a stranger knocked at their door and said that he was a carpenter who could help them build the staircase.He constructed the staircase, all by himself, which was considered to be the pride of carpentery.None knew how the staircase could stand by itself as it did not have a central support.Then the carpenter, who did not use a single nail or glue to construct this staircase, disappeared without even waiting for his payment.There was a rumour in the city of Santa F that the carpenter was St. Joseph himself, sent by Jesus Christ to attend to the nuns problem. Since then, the staircase was called miraculous and the site for pilgrimages.There are three mysteries about this staircase, says the spokesman of the chapel. The first mystery is that, to this day, the identity of the builder is not known.The second mystery is that the architects, engineers and scientists say that they cannot understand how this staircase can balance without any central support.The third mystery is from where did the wood come? They have checked and found out that the type of wood used to build the staircase does not exist in the entire region.There is another detail that has just increased the belief in the supposed miracle.The staircase has 33 steps, the age of Jesus Christ.The Loretto Chapel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA is a former Roman Catholic church that is now used as a museum and wedding chapel.[1] It is known for its unusual helix shaped spiral staircase, that may have been created by French carpenter Francois Jean Frenchy Rochas. The Sisters of Loretto credit St. Joseph with its construction.It has been the subject of legend and rumor, and the circumstances surrounding its construction and its builder are considered miraculous by the Sisters of Loretto and many visitors. .....
Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian
13. The Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian is a museum devoted to Native American arts. It is located in Santa Fe, New Mexico and was founded in 1937 by Mary Cabot Wheelwright, who came from Boston, and Hastiin Klah, a Navajo singer and medicine man.
Wheelwright and Klah were introduced in 1921 and quickly became close friends. It was not long before they determined to create a permanent record of Klahs and other singers ritual knowledge. Klah dictated and Wheelwright recorded the Navajo Creation Story and other great narratives that form the basis of Navajo religion. While Wheelwright concentrated on the spoken word in Navajo ritual, Frances Newcomb focused on the sandpaintings that are created and destroyed during healing ceremonies, recreating versions of them in tempera on paper. Klah participated in yet another way he was a weaver, and his huge tapestries were also permanent records of sandpaintings.By the early 1930s, it was clear to Wheelwright and Klah that a museum would be necessary to realize their goals. It could not be simply a repository for the sound recordings, manuscripts, paintings, and sandpainting tapestries. It had to offer the public an opportunity to sense the beauty, dignity, and profound logic of Navajo religion. Their chosen architect, William Penhallow Henderson, based his design on the hooghan, the traditional Navajo home and the setting for Navajo ceremonies. Klah blessed the ground on which the museum is built but died a few months before it was completed. A traditional Navajo house blessing was conducted by the singer Big Man in November 1937 and many of Klahs relatives attended. The museums earliest names were the Navajo House of Prayer and the House of Navajo Religion, but, soon after it opened to the public, its name officially became the Museum of Navajo Ceremonial Art.In the 1960s and 1970s, the Navajo Nation exerted its independence through a number of sweeping changes, including the establishment of its own community college system. Also at that time Navajo singers founded the Navajo Medicine Mens Association. The teachings of traditional Navajo religion enjoyed a revival, and its practitioners began to express their concerns about the teaching of Navajo religion by anyone other than Navajos. In 1977 the Museum therefore repatriated several Navajo medicine bundles and other items to the Navajo people.With the repatriation of 1977, the museum changed its name to the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian. Although it is no longer actively involved in the study of Navajo religion, it maintains growing, worldrenowned collections that document Navajo art and culture from 1850 to the present. It also presents changing exhibitions on traditional and contemporary Navajo and other Native American arts. .....
San Miguel Mission
14. San Miguel Mission, also known as San Miguel Chapel, is a Spanish colonial mission church in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Built between approximately 1610 and 1626, it is claimed to be the oldest church in the United States. The church was damaged during the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 but was rebuilt in 1710 following the Spanish reconquest and served for a time as a chapel for the Spanish soldiers. The wooden reredos, which includes a wooden statue of Saint Michael dating back to at least 1709, was added in 1798. Though the church has been repaired and rebuilt numerous times over the years, its original adobe walls are still largely intact despite having been hidden by later additions.The church is a contributing property in the Barrio De Analco Historic District, which is a U.S. National Historic Landmark.
Original thick walled church bell within San Miguel Mission at Santa Fe, New Mexico with the inscription San Jose Rogad Por Nosotros Agosto 9 de 1356/1856 in English, the bell reads St. Joseph Pray for us August 9th, 1356/1856. It is thought that the 8 was changed to a 3 during the late 1800s as a means of luring in tourists.Constructed in 1610 by the Tlaxcalan Indians of Mexico, who came to New Mexico as servants of the Spanish, this is the oldest church still in use in the country.
Recognized asthe Oldest Church in the United States, San Miguel Mission is located one block south of Loretto Chapel on Old Santa Fe Trail, between Alameda and Paseo de Peralta. Within easy walking distance from the historic Santa Fe Plaza, it is now surrounded by lovely restaurants and shops, and with theOldest House right down the alley, its definitely a must see on any Santa Fe site list.A threetier tower was constructed around 1830, and in 1887, a single facade tower was built, with massive stone buttresses added for support. The reredos in the Mission dates from 1798 and is the oldest wooden reredos in New Mexico. There is also a wood carved statue of St. Michael, celebrating the victory over Satan.The Mission is open to the public during the week and there is a small gift shop adjoining the main church. Regular services are held each Sunday.
San Miguel is a vibrant parish in the heart of central New Mexico. Our mission is to strive to bring people closer to God. We, the faith filled members of the Parish and its Missions, part of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, find strength, unity and grace in the celebration of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. As the voices and hands of Jesus in our time, our purpose is to express Gods grace by offering Christion Love and Service to each other and to everyone we meet. We reach out to the world in prayer, action and deeds in unity with the Holy Roman Catholic Church. .....
Canyon Road, Santa Fe
15. Canyon Road is an art district, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with over a hundred art galleries and studios exhibiting Native American art and antiquities, traditional and modern Hispanic art, regional contemporary art, international folk art and international contemporary art.Canyon Road had its beginnings as a residential neighborhood. Houses built in the Pueblo Revival style, in accordance with the local Hispanic and Pueblo methods were constructed with adobe walls and courtyards, often as compounds for extended family. Canyon Road is a long, narrow road that leads to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Artists were drawn to its beauty and began to create a subculture of artist run studios and galleries. Over time, as Santa Fe became more of a tourist destination, Canyon Road became known to the wider world. The area hosts a Farolito walk open house event on Christmas Eve that can attract thousands to the area.Explore the history of Santa Fes art scene as you stroll historic Canyon Road, a perfect vacation destination just minutes away from the top Santa Fe hotels, inns, and bed and breakfasts.While gracious adobe architecture gives Canyon Road its old world charm, diversity is its claim to fame. More than a hundred galleries, jewelry stores, clothing boutiques, home furnishings shops, artist studios, and gourmet restaurants line this magical half mile.

As a collector, whether you prefer art that is contemporary, abstract, modern, expressionistic, figurative, photorealistic, traditional, western or Native American, its all here. Galleries showcase paintings in oil, acrylic, watercolor, and encaustic, fine art photography, graphics such as lithographs, serigraphs, gicles, woodcuts, engravings, and monotypes, as well as sculpture in stone, bronze, wood, and glass.Add something special to your life by visiting Canyon Roads boutiques, which abound with unique fashions and wearable art. Jewelry stores dazzle with contemporary handmade adornments in gold and silver, and traditional and Native silverwork and inlays. Find that perfect enhancement for your home in shops featuring antiques and fine furniture, Native American pottery, rugs, gifts, folk art, and handmade crafts, as well as cutting edge contemporary furnishings.An artist colony in its early history, Santa Fe still attracts painters and sculptors who work in studios along Canyon Road and invite the public to watch them at work.Plan on spending the day, enjoying casual and fine dining in shady garden patios and at world class restaurants.There are plenty of benches with views.Discover the muse that makes life worth living Canyon Road a place that has inspired creativity for centuries. .....
Hyde Memorial State Park
16. Hyde Memorial State Park is a state park of New Mexico, United States, located 8 miles (13 km) northeast of Santa Fe in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.Summertime activities include hiking and camping, and in the winter the park is popular for tubing on the snow covered hillsides.A nice campground in the Sangre de Cristo mountains outside of Santa Fe. This campground area is popular, and with good reason. The trailhead for the Hyde Park Loop is nearby, and part of the loop is through the campground. .....
Fort Marcy New Mexico
17. Fort Marcy was a military reservation in New Mexico. In May of 1846 the United States declared war on the Republic of Mexico after a dispute arose over the location of the southern border of the newly annexed State of Texas. Led by General Stephen W. Kearney, his Army of the West, with approximately 1,700 troops, marched into the city of Santa Fe to claim the city and the entire New Mexico Territory on August 18, 1846. On the next day, Kearney ordered two of his chief engineers, William Emory and Jeremy Gilmer, who would go on to serve as a major general and chief engineer for the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War, to stake out a good site for a defensive fort. This was crucial in order to prevent an upheaval by the already conquered population. Lt. Emory found the perfect spot in what he calledthe only point which commands the entire town.At the location was a summit positioned on a flat topped hill, a mere 650 yards northeast of Santa Fes plaza.
In 1887, A Silver City citizen, Mrs. Tassie Wilson, went to the territorial capital for a visit. During her stay, she and her friends discovered a plethora of Spanish coins hidden beneath the walls of old Fort Marcy. This incident, first reported by the Silver City Enterprise on September 30, claimed her find to be more than $2,300 worth of coins, the oldest of which dated back to 1740 and 1726 and were donated to the Historical Society of New Mexico. The paper went on to state:After the discovery was made, large numbers of Santa Fe citizens turned out and dug the whole country up in the vicinity of the fort, but without finding anything new. The chaotic hunt was ultimately the destructive force that ended the remaining standing walls. The government sold the Fort Marcy location at auction in 1891. The city of Santa Fe acquired the site on the hill in 1961, while landscaping it and establishing a scenic overlook of the city. .....
Santa Fe Plaza
18. The Santa Fe Plaza is a National Historic Landmark in downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico. The mirrors traditional Spanish American colonial cities. The plaza, or city square, was originally, and is still to this day, the center gathering place in town. Many know it as the heart of Santa Fe. The landmark has since grown into a playground for many tourists interested in Spanish, Native American, and Mexican cultures, and includes music, design, jewelry, art and dance. Known to locals simply as the Plaza, it is home to annual events including Fiestas de Santa Fe, the Spanish Market, the Santa Fe Bandstand, and the Santa Fe Indian Market.Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Plaza consists of a central park lined with grass, trees, and benches, which add to the cultural scenery, especially at Christmas time when the Plaza streets and buildings glow with farolitos and the occasional luminaria, and trees glow with lights. Included in the park is an American Indian War Memorial monument as well as a performing arts stage.Encompassed in the general Plaza area are historic monuments, restaurants, businesses and art galleries, including the Palace of the Governors (the oldest public building in the U.S.), the New Mexico Museum of Art,Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi, and the Loretto Chapel. In true pueblo fashion, the Plaza architecture is traditional adobe. Just 16 miles from the Santa Fe ski basin, the Plaza dates back to the early 18th century when Santa Fe was settled by conquistadors. Until the mid 19th century, the Plaza lacked landscaping, and ownership of the area transitioned between the Spaniards and the Mexicans throughout the earlier years.
The Santa Fe Plaza is a relatively small urban park, visited by 100,000 visitors annually. It is used for over a half dozen events per year, drawing another 25,000 people and causing considerable impact on the plaza landscape. .....
Santa Fe National Cemetery
19. Santa Fe National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery in the city of Santa Fe, in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. It encompasses 78.6 acres , and as of the end of 2005, had 39,695 interments. It is one of only two national cemeteries in New Mexico (the other being Fort Bayard National Cemetery).Though New Mexico only played a small part in the American Civil War, the cemetery was created after the war to inter the Union soldiers who died fighting there, primarily at the Battle of Glorieta Pass. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santa Fe donated the land to the federal government in 1870. In 1876 its status was changed to a post cemetery, but in 1885 it became a national cemetery once again.
At the close of the Civil War, the Federal Government established a small cemetery to hold the remains of Union troops who died in the battles over Santa Fe. During the Civil War, the Confederacy made unsuccessful attempts to control what was then the territory of New Mexico. Seeking to disrupt the Union presence in the western territories and expand westward to the Pacific, Confederate forces succeeded in briefly capturing Santa Fe in March 1862. A series of short yet intense battles uprooted Confederate troops, who left the city in April. In 1875, the cemetery expanded and was officially dedicated as a national cemetery. Today, the 34 acre cemetery is the final resting place of Civil War veterans, a U.S. Secretary of War, and veterans from World Wars I and II, as well as from more recent conflicts.

The Confederate States of America, amidst the early battles of the Civil War, sought to expand its reach across the continent.In December 1861, Confederate General Henry Hopkins Sibley led a command from Texas north toward Santa Fe to claim the New Mexico territory. With an early victory over Union forces at Valverde, New Mexico, in February 1862, Sibley and his 2,300 men force occupied Santa Fe on March 16 without opposition.Sibley turned his sights to Glorieta Pass, a strategic path along the Santa Fe Trail leading through the Sangre de Cristo Mountains roughly 16 miles from Santa Fe. Control over the pass would allow Confederate troops to access the high plains and attack Fort Union, 60 miles northeast of Santa Fe. Union forces encountered Sibleys men at Apache Canyon near Glorieta on March 28, 1862. After a series of skirmishes, Confederate forces retreated to Santa Fe. Union troops destroyed the Confederate supply wagons, forcing Sibley to abandon Santa Fe and return defeated across the Texas border.
In 1870, the bishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santa Fe donated a small parcel of land to the federal government to establish a cemetery. In 1875, the federal government purchased an adjoining twoacre tract from the archdiocese. The two parcels were joined and established as the Santa Fe National Cemetery on April 6, 1875.Initially, the cemetery held only the remains of 265 Union soldiers who died in the Battle of Glorieta Pass and other military actions in New Mexico. Later, the government transferred the remains of soldiers from remote post cemeteries in New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah.For a short period, between 1876 and 1892, the War Department downgraded the cemetery to a post cemetery for Santa Fes Fort Marcy. The government again conferred national cemetery status in 1892, and purchased an additional seven acres for expansion purposes.In 1953, the government acquired an additional 25 acres, bringing the cemetery to its current size of 34 acres. .....
Madrid
20. Madrid is a census designated place (CDP) in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, United States. It is part of the Santa Fe, New Mexico Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 149 at the 2000 census and 204 at the 2010 census.Today, Madrid has become an artists community with galleries lining New Mexico State Road 14. It retains remnants of its past with the Mineshaft Tavern and the Coal Mine Museum.As of the census of 2000, there were 149 people, 82 households, and 27 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 105.0 people per square mile (40.5/km2). There were 103 housing units at an average density of 72.6 per square mile (28.0/km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 89.93% White, 2.01% African American, 1.34% Native American, 4.03% from other races, and 2.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 20.81% of the population.There were 82 households out of which 17.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 20.7% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 65.9% were non families. 52.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.

The average household size was 1.82 and the average family size was 2.68.In the CDP the population was spread out with 16.8% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 34.9% from 25 to 44, 36.9% from 45 to 64, and 6.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 109.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.7 males.The median income for a household in the CDP was $21,905, and the median income for a family was $7,386. Males had a median income of $50,385 versus $28,750 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $20,025. There were 52.4% of families and 19.8% of the population living below the poverty line, including 43.5% of under eighteens and none of those over 64. .....
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