Athens

Athens
1. Athens is the historical capital of Europe, with a long history, dating from the first settlement in the Neolithic age. In the 5th Century BC the culmination of Athens long, fascinating history the citys values and civilization acquired a universal significance. Over the years, a multitude of conquerors occupied Athens, and erected unique, splendid monuments a rare historical palimpsest. In 1834, it became the capital of the modern Greek state and in two centuries since it has become an attractive modern metropolis with unrivalled charm.A large part of the towns historic centre has been converted into a 3kilometre pedestrian zone (the largest in Europe), leading to the major archaeological sites reconstructing to a large degree the ancient landscape.

Many believe that Athena, with her close connection to the city of Athens, was named after the citystate, possibly invented as a new patron deity for the area. This idea is supported by the fact that the goddess was called by different names depending on where she was worshipped/where she presided over her cult. For where she was known as Athenai in Athens, she was called Mykene in Mycaene and Thebe in Thebes. G. Neumann has suggested that the name Athena is a compound of the Lydian word and the Hurrian deity . Considering the fact that Athena was known to be a virgin goddess and Ana was a fertility and mother goddess, this link is dubious, and I am more likely to believe that the name Athena was an invention of the Athenian people, although it is unlikely that they would have invented an entirely new deity, rather renaming an existing goddess to be the patron of their city. This seems plausible, considering the appearance of Athenas name in surviving Linear B tablets invoking her name dating from the Minoan era, which literally translates as lady of Athens. .....

Acropolis of Athens
2. The Acropolis of Athens and its monuments are universal symbols of the classical spirit and civilization and form the greatest architectural and artistic complex bequeathed by Greek Antiquity to the world. In the second half of the fifth century bc, Athens, following the victory against the Persians and the establishment of democracy, took a leading position amongst the other citystates of the ancient world. In the age that followed, as thought and art flourished, an exceptional group of artists put into effect the ambitious plans of Athenian statesman Pericles and, under the inspired guidance of the sculptor Pheidias, transformed the rocky hill into a unique monument of thought and the arts. The most important monuments were built during that time the Parthenon, built by Ictinus, the Erechtheon, the Propylaea, the monumental entrance to the Acropolis, designed by Mnesicles and the small temple Athena Nike. .....
Parthenon
3. The Parthenon stands proudly as the centerpiece of Centennial Park, Nashvilles premier urban park. The recreation of the 42foot statue Athena is the focus of the Parthenon just as it was in ancient Greece. The building and the Athena statue are both fullscale replicas of the Athenian originals.Originally built for Tennessees 1897 Centennial Exposition, this replica of the original Parthenon in Athens serves as a monument to what is considered the pinnacle of classical architecture. The plaster replicas of the Parthenon Marbles found in the Naos are direct casts of the original sculptures which adorned the pediments of the Athenian Parthenon, dating back to 438 B.C. The originals of these powerful fragments are housed in the British Museum in London.The Parthenon also serves as the city of Nashvilles art museum. The focus of the Parthenons permanent collection is a group of 63 paintings by 19th and 20th century American artists donated by James M. Cowan. Additional gallery spaces provide a venue for a variety of temporary shows and exhibits. .....
Plaka
4. The Plaka is the oldest section of Athens. Most of the streets have been closed to automobile traffic, though you should still keep a watchful eye for a speeding motorcycle or delivery truck. At one time it was the nightclub district, but most of these closed down when the government outlawed amplified music in the neighborhood in the seventies in an effort to get rid of undesirables. The strategy was very successful and it is now an area of restaurants, Jewelry stores tourist shops, and cafes. Though it is quite commercialized it is still a neighborhood and arguably the nicest neighborhood in central Athens. Most of the restaurants are typical tourist places but the quality of food is not bad in some of them and if you follow my leads in the restaurant section of this guide you should have a few enjoyable evenings and not be unpleasantly surprised by the bill or wake up with a gastrointestinal disorder on the day you were supposed to visit the Acropolis. .....
Ancient Agora of Athens
5. The agora was the central marketplace in most Greek citystates. Typically the agora was located in the center of town. Governmental buildings, such as the council building and courts, surrounded the agora in Athens. There were also two temples on the edge of the agora in Athens.The agora was more than a marketplace. People came to the agora to discuss politics, meet with friends, as well as buy items from the MARKET. Rich women were not seen in the agora instead, their husbands or slaves would do the shopping for them. Only poor women, who had no help, would go to the market alone.In Athens, three different officials were elected to insure fair TRADE. A metronomoi checked weights and measures to insure TRADERS were not shortchanging their customers. An agoranomoi checked the quality of goods, while a sitophylakes oversaw the grain TRADE.As is the case in most Greek cities, modern buildings have been built over the agora of Athens. In 1924, the Greek government decided to excavate the Athens agora site. The numberof houses on the excavation site was more that the Greek government could afford to buy. In 1928, millionaire John D. Rockefeller donated $250,000 to finance the excavation of the site. .....
National Archaeological Museum
6. The National Archaeological Museum in Athens houses some of the most important artifacts from a variety of archaeological locations around Greece from prehistory to late antiquity. It is considered one of the great museums in the world and contains the richest collection of artifacts from Greek antiquity worldwide. It is situated in the Exarcheia area in central Athens between Epirus Street, Bouboulinas Street and Tositsas Street while its entrance is on the Patission Street adjacent to the historical building of the Athens Polytechnic university. .....
Mount Lycabettus
7. Myth claims that Athenss highest hill came into existence when Athena removed a piece of Mt. Pendeli, intending to boost the height of her temple on the Acropolis. While she was en route, a crone brought her bad tidings, and the flustered goddess dropped the rock in the middle of the city. Kids love the ride up the steeply inclined teleferique (funicular) to the summit (one ride every 30 minutes), crowned by whitewashed Ayios Georgios chapel with a bell tower donated by Queen Olga. On a clear day, you can see Aegina island, with or without the aid of coinoperated telescopes. Built into a cave on the side of the hill, near the spot where the I Prasini Tenta cafe used to be, is a small shrine to Ayios Isidoros. In 1859 students prayed here for those fighting against the Austrians, French, and Sardinians with whom King Otho had allied. From Mt. Lycabettus you can watch the sunset and then turn about to watch the moon rise over violetcrowned Hymettus as the lights of Athens blink on all over the city. Refreshments are available from the modest kiosk popular with concertgoers who flock to events at the hills openair theater during summer months. Diners should also note that Lycabettus is home to Orizontes Lykavittou, an excellent fish restaurant. .....
Monastiraki
8. Shopping in Athens is a favorite pastime for tourists and Athenians and one of the best places to buy just about anything is the Flea Market at Monastiraki. OK. It is not really a flea market except maybe on Sunday when some of the stores close and people bring tables and carpets and sell all kinds of stuff from junk to antiques. The rest of the week it is more like the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul though not so grand and not so bizarre. Most of the shops are pretty conventional and sell the same stuff you find in the tourist shops on the islands, some of it made in Greece and some made in China or other cheap labor countries. You will find the same designs on GREECE Tshirts as you saw in Aruba or Mexico, as well as some you might actually classify as art or somehow unique. There are good jewelry store with handmade GOLD AND SILVER pieces and fake jewelry stores with handmade gold and silver pieces, and most people wont be able to tell the difference. .....
Panathenaic Stadium
9. The Panathenaic Stadium is located on the site of an ancient stadium and for many centuries hosted games in which nude male athletes competed (gymnikoi agones) in track events, athletics championships as we would call them today. The games, which since antiquity had been held in an area far from the city, were included in the programme of the Panathenaia festival celebrations in 566/565 BC. When the orator Lykourgos assumed responsibility for the finances of Athens, in 338 BC, he included in the public works carried out in the city the building of a Stadium. The ravine running between Ardettos Hill and the low height opposite, extra muros of the city and in an idyllic setting on the verdant banks of the River Ilissos, was deemed to be an ideal location. This was private land but its owner, Deinias, conceded it to the State for the construction of a Stadium. Major earthremoval works transformed the ravine into a space for contests, with the features of the Greek stadium parallelogram shape with entrance at one narrow end and room for the spectators on the earth slopes of the other three sides. Lykourgos stadium was used for the first time during the celebration of the Great Panathenaia in 330/29 BC, when games in which nude athletes competed were held. .....
Temple of Hephaestus
10. The Temple of Hephaestus or Thissio as it is called by the Athenians is located in Thission, within the area of the Ancient Agora of Athens (entrance from Monastiraki at Adrianou street) and very close to Areios Pagos and the Acropolis. It was dedicated to Hephaestus and Athens (godess) Ergani . Today the Temple and the area is called Thission based on a more recent opinion that the Temple was dedicated to Theseus.The Temple of Hephaestus is build in Doric style probably from the Architect of Parthenon Iktinos in 450 BC.It has 6 columns in each close and 13 on each side.The pediment sculptures probably represents a battle of Theseus and the Lapiths against the Centaurs in mount Pelion.On the east front of the Temple, towards to the Ancient Agora on the frieze are sculptures depicting the labours of Hercules. On the western side sculpture is reflected the fall of Troy while in another eastern frieze depicts a battle scene. .....
Benaki Museum
11. The Benaki Museum is a remarkable museum with a diverse collection that gives an overview of art and culture in Greece from the Neolithic Age to the early twentieth century.Antonis Benakis (1873 1954) was born in Alexandria, Egypt as the son of a wealthy Greek merchant, Emmanouil Benakis, who had made his fortune in Egypt. Antonis was an art connoisseur and started collecting art while in Egypt. When he moved to Athens in 1926 he decided to donate his art collections to the Greek state. They are now displayed in his parental home, a beautiful neoclassical mansion purchased in 1910 by his father. The building, sporting a stylish fa .....
Syntagma Square
12. Syntagma Square is the most important square in Athens it is constantly crowded with locals and tourists alike. The square is bordered on the east side by the Hellenic Parliament Building.Syntagma Square is the hub of public transportation in the city buses, trolleys, trams, and the metro all stop here. The square also boasts a central fountain, a number of statues and two grassy areas with lots of trees, perfect for relaxing in the shade.The main attraction at Syntagma Square is the House of Parliament, originally built in 1842 as the Royal Palace. Evzones, members of the presidential guard dressed in traditional uniforms stand vigil at the Tomb of the unknown soldier in front of the parliament. The hourly Changing of the Guard ceremony always attracts a crowd of tourists. .....
Philopappos Monument
13. The Philopappos Monument, crowning the Mouseion Hill to the southwest of the Acropolis, is the tomb of Caius Julius Antiochos Philopappos, a member of the royal family of Commagene, a small Hellenistic kingdom in southeastern Turkey and northern Syria. The Roman emperor Vespasian annexed the kingdom to the Roman empire in 72 A.D., and the royal family was sent into exile. Philopappos lived in Athens and became an Athenian citizen. He was also a Roman citizen and held several very important offices during the reign of the emperor Trajan, including that of consul. A Latin inscription on the tomb referring to specific titles of the emperor Trajan allows us to date the construction of the monument (and the death of Philopappos) to between 114 and 116 A.D. Since the Athenians allowed him to be buried in this very elaborate mausoleum right opposite the Acropolis and within the formal boundaries of the city we suspect that he also must have been an important benefactor of the ancient city of Athens. .....
Acropolis Museum
14. When Melina Mercouri decided to turn her dream into reality and announced a competition to design a new museum for the Acropolis in Athens, you could be forgiven for thinking that the Ancient gods of Greece were determined to stop her. The plan to build a new museum was plagued by problems and delays. Architects and contractors went to court to fight for the lucrative contract to design and build the new museum local residents went to court to protect historic local buildings from demolition and just when work finally started on the winning design of Manfredi Nicoletti and Lucio Passarelli, an ancient urban development began to emerge from the ground being dug for the foundations. Construction work immediately ground to a halt. .....
Temple of Olympian Zeus
15. The building of the Temple of Olympian Zeus actually began in the 6th Century by Peisistratos but work was stopped either because of a lack of MONEY or because Pisistratuss son, Hippias, was overthrown in 510 BC. The temple was not finished until the Emperor Hadrian completed in 131 AD, seven hundred years later. There were other attempts to continue the building. The Classical Greeks (487379)left it unfinished because they believed it was too big and symbolized the arrogance of people who believed they were equal to the Gods. During the Third Century when the Macedonians ruled Athens work was begun again by Antiochus the IV of Syria who wanted to build the worlds largest temple and hired the Roman architect Cossotius to complete the job, but this ended when Antiochus died. In 86 BC, during Roman rule the general Sulla took two columns from the unfinished temple to Rome for the Temple of Jupiter on the Capitoline Hill which influenced the development of the Corinthian style in Rome. .....
National Garden
16. Athens can be a very hot and polluted place in summer. The National gardens provide the perfect way for a traveller to escape these urban plagues and enjoy a bit of shade and greenery between the monuments. The gardens have a wide variety of flora and fauna, although they arent arranged as exhibits of particular plant species. In the eastern section of the park is a small area with captive birds, especially peacocks (youll hear them screech before you see the cages). If youre lucky, youll be able to wander through while army recruits are doing their exercises in the park, and you can feel as if you are part of the militarys training regime.
Then again, you may want to avoid the military, given recent disturbances in Athens. In any case, the most likely ruckus youll stumble on here is a petulant child who doesnt want to leave the ducks.To the south the National Garden is bordered by the equally pleasant gardens of the Zappeion. The gardens surround the neoclassical Zappeion, a large exposition and congress hall that was built in the nineteenth century. At the center of the garden stands a large fountain, built to commemorate the inauguration of the Marathon Dam. .....
Odeon of Herodes Atticus
17. Odeon of Herodes Atticus, widely also known as Herodion, is situated under Acropolis with entrance from the pedestrian street of Dionysius Areopagite. As part of the Athens Festival every summer there are several performances at the Herodion. The feeling of a night concert at Herodion, under Acropolis rock, overlooking the illuminated Parthenon, is truly unique!The Odeon of Herodes Atticus the Herodeion was a large covered theater built in the second century AD. The odeon partially survived and is still a popular location for plays, concerts and other events. .....
Areopagus
18. The hill of Mars, the seat of the ancient and VENERABLE supreme court of Athens, called the Areopagites, Acts 171934. It was composed entirely of exarchons, of grave and blameless character, and their wise and just decisions made it famous far beyond the bounds of Greece. Their numbers and authority varied greatly from age to age. They held their sessions by night. They took cognizance of murders, impieties, and immoralities punished vices of all kinds, idleness included rewarded or assisted the virtuous and were peculiarly attentive to blasphemies against the gods, and to the performance of the sacred mysteries. The case of Paul, therefore, would naturally come before them, for he sought to subvert their whole system of idolatry, and establish Christianity in its place. The Bible narrative, however, rather describes an informal popular movement. Having heard Paul discoursing from day to day in the market place, the philosophic and inquisitive Athenians took him one day up into the adjacent hill, for a more full and quiet exposition of his doctrine. The stone seats of the Areopagus lay open to the sky in the court stood Epicureans, Stoics, etc. around them spread the city, full of idolaters and their temples and little southeast rose the steep height of the Acropolis, on whose level summit were crowded more and richer idolatrous structures than on any other equal space in the world. Amid this scene, Paul exhibited the sin and folly of idolworship with such boldness and power, that none could refute him, and some were converted. .....
Kolonaki
19. Kolonaki is the chic residential neighborhood and upmarket shopping centre of Athens that hugs Lykabettus Hill. Athenian aristocracy resides here. Youll find expensive boutiques, pricey restaurants, and private art galleries. Every major luxury brand is here. All greek celebrities have a coffee or two in the cafes. Its also a chic and expensive place to live.Its a nice place to go if you like window shopping or want to find a cafe to enjoy a coffee and engage in a little people watching. The name Lykabettus literally means hill of wolves from the time when the hill was covered in pine forests and inhabited by wolves. Today the hill is inhabited by Athenian socialites and a cloak of cement apartment buildings. Museums abound in Kolonaki from private to highly specialized public collections. The height of Kolonaki is quite literally the top of Lykabettus Hill. The peak affords views of the entire basin that Athens sits in and is worth a visit, especially at sundown. On clear days you can see all the way to the Saronic Gulf islands of Aegina and Salamis while enjoying a drink or meal.Few visitors, even locals, know the exact origin of its name. Kolonaki in greek means little column and is named after a small ancient column in the midle of the square. All the surrounding area is named after it. .....
Kerameikos
20. Kerameikos was on the northwest fringe of the ancient city and and is now the outer edge of the areas visited by most travelers. But if you follow Ermou street down from the Monastiraki train station you will easily find it on your right and if you were as lucky as I was and go in the winter or offseason you may have the place to yourself. Kerameikos is named after Keramos, son of Dionysios and Ariadne, hero of potters. The area was used continuously for burials from the twelfth century BC for a thousand years.When you vist Greece in the summer, the ground around the ancient stones has been baked by the sun and anything that was alive is as brown as the dirt. But in the winter when it rains everything is covered in grass and moss and it gives you a strange feeling like you are in Ireland, in some remains of an ancient Greek or Roman colony . And since the summer crowds are at home you can have places like Kerameikos to yourself. .....
Choragic Monument of Lysicrates
21. The Choragic Monument of Lysicrates stands in the heart of the Plaka, the historic quarter of Athens at the base of the Acropolis.Erected in 334 B.C., the compact structure is only thirtythree feet high but displays the most elaborate version of the Greek Corinthian order surviving from ancient times. This rendition of the Corinthian is unique to this monument. Since its recording and publication by James Stuart and Nicholas Revett in the first volume of The Antiquities of Athens (1762), the Lysicrates Corinthian has been utilized to enrich important Greek Revival buildings on both sides of the Atlantic.Like the Choragic Monument of Thrasyllus, the Lysicrates monument was erected to commemorate winning first prize in a chorus performance. The prize, a bronze trophy in the form of a tripod supporting an urn, was placed on top of the monuments fancy carved finial. The appearance of the trophy is recorded in basrelief figures on the frieze behind the monuments column capitals. The monument stood partially encased in the walls of a French Capuchin monastery when Stuart and Revett encountered it in 1751. They published their drawing of its existing state in The Antiquities of Athens along with their measured drawings.The monastery burned in 1821. Its ruins were then demolished, leaving the monument a freestanding structure as originally built. .....
Hellenic Parliament
22. It was in 1996 that the idea was born of setting up a Foundation to undertake the planning and implementation of activities and events which, although strictly beyond the ambit of the Hellenic Parliaments parliamentary work, were nonetheless connecteddirectly or indirectly with its institutional role and mission.Thus in 1997, following a proposal tabled by the President of Parliament and approved by the Council of Presidents of Parliament, the Plenum of Parliament resolved to establish a private, nonprofit organization within the Hellenic Parliament charged with fostering both the principles of Parliamentarism and Democracy and the participation of the Hellenic Parliament in the cultural, social, and educational life of the nation, as well as with supporting attempts to improve the international standing of Greece in general (Article 167A of the Standing Orders of the Hellenic Parliament Part One).In May 1999, the Plenum of Parliament voted unanimously in favour both of the institution of the Foundation of the Hellenic Parliament for Parliamentarism and Democracy, and of the Articles governing its operation.On December 8, 2003, the Board of Administration met for the first time. .....
Arch of Hadrian
23. The Arch of Hadrian was erected in honor of the Roman emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century A.D (and probably a little before 131/132 A.D. when we know Hadrian visited Athens). The arch was built over the line of an ancient road that led from the area of the Acropolis and the Athenian Agora to the Olympieion and southeast Athens. (It was never an actual gate in a wall). An inscription (IG II2 5185) on the western side of the arch (facing the Acropolis) states This is Athens, the ancient or former city of Theseus. An inscription on the eastern side of the arch (facing the Olympieion) states This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus. Scholars have traditionally interpreted the inscriptions as meaning that the arch stood at the boundaries of old Athens (to the west) and new Athens or Hadrianoupolis (to the southeast). Another interpretation sees the inscriptions as honoring Hadrian as the new founder (what the ancient Greeks called a ktistes) of all of Athens, replacing even the hero Theseus in the hearts of the Athenians. .....
Pnyx
24. Pnyx Hill in Athens Located about 500m to the west of the Acropolis, the Pnyx is a rocky hill surrounded by parks. It has a special place in the world history as one of the most important historic sites. Artificially carved out of the hill side is a stone platform or Bema (which literally means step in Greek), with stone steps leading up to it. Pnyx is the place where the Athenians used to gather to talk on political issues and to take decisions on the future of their town. This was the first form of democracy in the world. It was the first time when all the citizens of a town, male citizens actually, were declared equal and had the right to vote and take part in decisionmaking. The Athenians believed that this task was very important to leave it to one person, the king or a governor, as was usually the case. This process was evolved as centuries went by and we have been led today to the present democratic forms. It is believed that the Pnyx was founded in the 5th century B.C. It passed three construction periods. At first, the Pnyx was a plain, natural area with a retaining wall to the north. Then, a semicircular retaining wall was built and two staircases were leading to the Bema, where the orators could speak. The area also had 500 wooden seats for the Councilmen elected by the Assembly. The third reformation of the Pnyx was based on the same design but was in larger scale. In the first century B.C., the Pnyx started to decline because Athens was getting bigger and it was difficult for many citizens to come to the Pnyx. The new Assembly of the Athenians was gathered in the theatre of Dionysos. .....
Theatre of Dionysus
25. The Theatre of Dionysus is on the south slope of the Acropolis, and is said to be the birthplace modern theatre. Although now the theatre of Dionysus doesnt look that impressive, especially next to the much better preserved Odeon or Theatre of Herodes Atticus, in its day it would have been an incredible sight.The Theatre is built in to a hollow on the Acropolis rock and wasnt discovered until well into the 18th century. Remains have been found at the site that date back to the 6th century and are all to do with the worship of the God Dionysus, the first signs of a theatre are not until the 5th century BC, probably made out of wood and stones being added later.Ancient monuments are the remnants of glorious civilizations of the past that laid the foundation of all things modern. The Theatre of Dionysus is one such remnant of ancient Greeces glorious past. Get acquainted with some interesting facts about Theatre of Dionysus in the following article. .....
Omonoia Square
26. Omonia Square (Plateia Omonias) is the center of Athens, and is composed of the actual square together with the surrounding streets, open areas and assemblage of grand buildings that include banks and offices. The neighboring area of Exarcheia to the north, dominated by the Athens Polytechnic and its famous band of anarchists, is a bohemian district with lots of bars and clubs visited by students, intellectuals and people who are into alternative culture.Omonia is the exact opposite of its neighbours Plaka & Monastiraki as there is no classical attraction in this multicultural area, however its where you go for cheap eateries, exotic imported goods and food and basically daytoday items at affordable price. .....
Stoa of Attalos
27. The Stoa of Attalos or Attalus located in the east side of archaeological site of the Ancient Agora in Athens just oposite the Adrianou street in Monastiraki. The Stoa of Attalos was built around 150 BC, by Attalos II, King of Pergamos as a donation to Athens. The construction of the building began in 159 BC and ended in 138 BC. The building was the largest in length in Greece during the antiquity. It was rebuilt in the same style and shape from 1953 to 1956 by the American School of Archaeology with funding from JD. Rockefeller and now houses the Museum of Ancient Agora in Athens.Typical of Hellenistic art, the stoa is a largescale building. It has two floors the ground floor belongs to the Doric style and the first floor to the Ionic style, the two levels are connected by two staircases located at the ends of the building.The walls are made of limestone, the facade from marble of Penteli and the roof is covered with tiles.The stoa during the antiquity had shops that where leased by the State of Athens. It was therefore an ancient shopping mall but also a place of sociability where citizens use to gather and discuss while sheltering from the sun during the summer and the cold in the winter. In the stoa of Attalos was signed the Treaty of the European Union enlargement in 2003. .....
Erechtheion
28. On the high stylobate of the south porch of the Erechtheion are six maidens, who take the place of columns in supporting the entablature. Now severely weathered and affected by pollution, five of the caryatids were removed to the Acropolis Museum in 1978 and replaced with replicas. The other figure (the second from the left in the first row of four) was appropriated by Lord Elgin, who, between 1801 and 1805, removed about half of the surviving sculptures from the fallen ruins of the Acropolis and from the Parthenon, itself. They were acquired by the British Museum in 1816 and put on public display the following year. Between 1937 and 1938, even the British caryatid, which certainly is in better condition than its sisters, was damaged when masons abraded the surface (as well as that of some of the Parthenon sculptures) in a misguided and unauthorized attempt to brighten them for the opening of the new gallery in which they were to be displayed. .....
Zappeion
29. Zappas instructed the design of the building to the Danish architect T.Hansen . After many delays the building was ready on the 20th of November 1874. The official inauguration took place with festivities the 20th of October 1888.The architecture of the building follows the neoclassical style, with its propylaea build in Corinthian style. The building in conjunction with the Stone Bridge of Ilissos, also sponsored by Evangelos Zappas, and the surrounding gardens, were the picture of Athens in the early 20th century . Unfortunately, Evangelos Zappas, did not live long enough to see the building in its final form. In his will left his cousin Konstantinos Zappas responsible for the execution and continue of the charitable work.The Zappeion has about 25 rooms. The initial use of the building and the courtyard space was for an agricultural, industrial and technical exhibition set to take place every four years. Zappeion was also used by the National Institute of Radio EIR from 1938. The building was Used in the Olympic Games in 1896 for the fencing championships, while during the Olympics of 2004 was a press and events centre. Many historical events took place in Zappeion with paramount the historic signing of the Treaty of Accession to the European Union (then EEC) of Greece in 1st of January 1981 by the Greek prime minister K. Karamanlis. Zappeion is the press centre in all General Elections of Greece where the leaders of the major political parties give an interview to the mass media after the end of the elections. .....
Hellenic Motor Museum
30. So you have been in Athens for a few days and you have seen all the ancient sites and you have been to all the museums and seen so much marble that when you go to sleep at night you get visions of tombstones. You think to yourself that it would be really nice to find a museum that does not have anything to do with ancient Greece or rocks. You are going through a condition that is commonly called anachronistic overload. Dont worry though. There is a cure. It is the The Hellenic Motor Museum, one of the finest collections of antique cars this side of Jay Lenos garage. These cars are the collection of Theodore N. Charagionis and they are on display in a beautiful modern building just a couple blocks from the National Archaeological Museum. For those who have been to other automobile museums in the USA, I think I can safely say you will find a few surprised at this one, cars you have probably never seen before and may never have heard of. For those who dont have an interest in cars, I think you will be impressed in the shape and style of these cars because the collection includes some of the most stylish cars ever made. And for you young rock and rollers who when it comes to cars can take it or leave it, there is a spectacular automobile that was owned by Robert Plant. The museum has a history of the wheel that starts at the bottom of a spiral walkway and leads you to the entrance of the museum. There is an early 20th century auto workshop and a gift shop too.For a short tour of a few of the many cars in the museum click on the first photo. If you like this page please share it with your friends on Facebook and Google+ using the buttons at the bottom of the page. .....
Hymettus
31. Located in a high technology incubation center in Guangzhou, China, Imetto Digital Imaging Technology was founded in 2000 and received a major capital investment from the Guangzhou Venture Capital Ltd in 2005. Although based in China, Imetto has evaluated numerous domestic and international sources for all its key subsystems as partners for the best performing and most reliable products. As a result, we are able to offer the optimum combination of Chinese and international technologies, research, development and manufacturing. Imetto has a very talented R&D group which developed our own laser scanning engine.Our main products are the Tera32 and Zetta50 largeformat digital photo laser printing systems, which use laser scanning technology to expose RA4compatible lightsensitive papers. With integrated paper processors, the systems are selfcontained, daylight operating printer centers that can output prints from 4x6 up to 30x180 (Tera32) or 50x200( Zetta 50), or larger. The Zetta50 is the worlds first integrated 50 wide format laser printer/processor. Imetto also provides systems for upgrading analog minilabs to highresolution full digital capability.Our domestic research, development, manufacturing and worldwide purchasing policies allow us to offer the most cost effective, highest performance and best quality products for our customers. Our domestic and overseas customers praise our customer support program.We are continuing to invest in R&D for improving our current products as well as producing products to meet the needs of tomorrows international image processing community. .....
Ilias Lalaounis Jewelry Museum
32. The Ilias Lalaounis Jewelry Museum is a unique museum devoted to the art of jewelry and the decorative arts. The museum was founded in 1993 and opened to the public, as a nonprofit organisation. Today the Museums permanent collection includes over 4000 pieces of jewelry and micro sculptures from over 50 collections designed by the museums founder, Ilias Lalaounis, between 1940 and 2000. The permanent collection is enriched with donations including jewelry and decorative arts from around the world.The main museum edifice was the original workshop of Ilias Lalaounis Company. The alterations of the space were designed by Bernard Zehrfuss (19081996) and the architectural plan was refined and carried out by the Architect, Vassilis Gregoriadis with the Engineer, George Athanasoulis.Temporary exhibitions with decorative arts, cultural programs involving research and educational programs for children on the ancient art of goldsmithing, publications and adult cultural activities are in the museums yearly agenda. The museums initiative focuses on cultural programs for special social groups such as individuals with disabilities and special interests groups include programs on jewelry design and making, gemology, art history, childrens theatre, family weekend programs, special workshops on temporary exhibitions. .....
Old Acropolis Museum
33. When Melina Mercouri decided to turn her dream into reality and announced a competition to design a new museum for the Acropolis in Athens, you could be forgiven for thinking that the Ancient gods of Greece were determined to stop her. The plan to build a new museum was plagued by problems and delays. Architects and contractors went to court to fight for the lucrative contract to design and build the new museum local residents went to court to protect historic local buildings from demolition and just when work finally started on the winning design of Manfredi Nicoletti and Lucio Passarelli, an ancient urban development began to emerge from the ground being dug for the foundations. Construction work immediately ground to a halt.With the new design chosen, time was running out to complete the New Acropolis Museum in time for the Athens Olympics of 2004. More delays meant that sadly that deadline was missed and it wasnt until 2007 that the building was finally completed. Next, all the exhibits from the old Acropolis Museum plus the many thousands of artefacts which had never been exhibited in that inadequate museum had to be transported to the new museum. .....
Old Parliament House
34. The mansion of the Old Parliament is located on Stadiou Street, in the square dominated by the statue of the 1821 Independence War, General Theodoros Kolokotronis. It is an architectural jewel in the center of Athens and one of the most historic buildings of the city.This neoclassical building was the first permanent home of the Greek Parliament. It was built in 1858 by Queen Amalia and was constructed on plans by Fran .....
Technopolis
35. The Gazi (Gaz) Factory was founded in 1857. It started functioning in 1862 and closed down its furnaces in August 1984. It was the last factory in Europe that was functioning in a traditional way until the day it closed. Today it is converted into the City of Athens Technopolis.The City of Athens Technopolis, spreads in an area of about 30.000 m2, is a vigorous industrial museum, of incomparable architecture, one of the most interesting of its kind in Europe. It is lodged in the old Athens Gasworks, widely known as Gazi, next to Keramikos and very close to the Acropolis. Its gradual transformation into a multipurpose cultural center, hosting various events, gives the opportunity to the visitors to tour in a site full of images, knowledge and emotions. The charm of a bygone era, clearly to be seen in the form of the funnels, the gasholders, the chimney stacks and retort furnaces, conspires in a way that establishes the Technopolis as a factory for protecting and generating art, since even in etymological terms the word gas comes from the old German word galst and later geist which means intellect or spirit.It has been operating since 1999 and it is dedicated to the memory of the great Greek composer Manos Chatzidakis. .....
National Gallery
36. The renovation project is estimated to cost around 45 million euros, 32 million of which are covered by European structural funds (ESPA) while the rest by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. The preparatory plans were paid by the Maria Tsakos Foundation.Details of this project were presented at a press conference attended by Alternate Culture Minister Kostas Tzavaras, Ministry Secretary General Lina Mendoni and Gallery Director Marina LambrakiPlaka. The director stated that the gallery had hosted six million visitors within the last twenty years, of whom only 5% were tourists, Amna reported.The priceless art will be temporarily housed in the National Bank vaults at Magoula Attikis and the Goudi Sculpture museum in Goudi, where some 120 of the Gallerys sculptures are going to be shown in revolving exhibitions. .....
Church of Panagia Kapnikarea
37. The Church of Panaghia Kapnikarea is the oldest church in Athens, it was built during the middle of the 11th century. The church is dedicated to Saint Mary but it is better known as Kapnikarea. As with other Early Christian churches, it was built over an ancient Greek pagan temple which was once possibly dedicated to Athena or Demeter.It was partially destroyed during the Greek War for Independence (18211829). By 1834 the church was further damaged and deserted. Ludwig of Bavaria intervened and the church was rescued. The building also escaped demolition in 1863 with the intervention of the Bishop of Athens. The church is currently owned by the University of Athens. .....
The Mall Athens
38. attica in The Mall Athens is the fashion placetobe for all casualwear and denim lovers. Based on the shopinashop concept, attica in The Mall Athens presents a selection of designer casualwear and denim brands such as Dsquared, Armani Jeans, Juicy Couture, Diesel, Napapijri, American Vintage, Converse and True Religion. With highend clothes, shoes and accessories, it is certain that you will not leave the store emptyhanded. .....
Hellinikon Olympic Complex
39. The new face of the former International Airport in Hellenikon will soon be a fact. This is definitively the most ambitious architectural project ever designed in the city. It will change the face of the coastal area, bringing thousands of work positions and millions of tourists in Athens.The Hellenikon deal is a breath of fresh air for the staggering Greek economy. After a long competition for the privatization of the 6,000 acres project, the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund (TAIPED) has approved the bid made by Greek company Lamda Development. It was the only legitimate bid left, after three more ventures withdrew in the process.The new face of the former International Airport in Hellenikon will soon be a fact. This is definitively the most ambitious architectural project ever designed in the city. It will change the face of the coastal area, bringing thousands of work positions and millions of tourists in Athens.The Hellenikon deal is a breath of fresh air for the staggering Greek economy. After a long competition for the privatization of the 6,000 acres project, the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund (TAIPED) has approved the bid made by Greek company Lamda Development. It was the only legitimate bid left, after three more ventures withdrew in the process. .....
Eleusinion
40. Demeter and Kore had their main sanctuary at Eleusis. However, after the integration of Eleusis into the Athenian State, a smaller sanctuary, called the Eleusinion, was built in Athens around 480 BC. It was located on the east side of the Panathenaic Way to the south of the Agora, on the north slope of the Akropolis. An earlier walled openair sanctuary already existed on the same location since around 550 BC.Each year, immediately after the celebration of the Mysteries at Eleusis, the Boule assembled within the walled precinct of the Eleusinion.The precinct consisted of a level terrace surrounded by walls. The 0.90 m thick precinct wall, dating from around 550 BC, was made of limestone in polygonal style. The north and south walls were 6 m high. The entrance to the sanctuary was located at the southwest corner. The precinct measuring some 40 m by 20 m was delimited to the north and south by streets connected to the Panathenaic Way, and to the west by the Panathenaic Way.The temple occupied the middle of the sanctuary and probably faced south. It consisted of a rectangular cella with a smaller treasure room behind it to the north and measured 11.00 m by 17.70 m. The building rested on a foundation of Kara limestone. The shrine was probably filled with ritual vases dedicated to the goddesses. Standing on a high terrace, the temple was visible from the road coming from Eleusis.There is still a doubt that this building might be the temple to Triptolemos rather than the Eleusinion proper. According to this theory the remains of the Eleusinion would still be unexcavated. .....
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