Forever young naturally eating

Natural Nutrition
1. Eating food in as close to its natural state as possible helps ensure maximum exposure to youth-enhancing nutrients, many of which are lost during storage, processing, and cooking. It also reduces your exposure to artificial additives used to enhance the flavor, texture, color, and shelf-life of processed foods, from preprepared meals to diet dishes. .....
Natural Nutrition Five a day
2. Keep looking and feeling young and help ward off diseases of aging, from Alzheimer’s to stroke and heart disease, by eating more fruit and vegetables. They are rich in antioxidants, and the biologically active ingredients of plant pigments and flavorings have antiaging properties, too. Aim to eat a minimum of five portions of fruit and vegetables daily and up to nine if you can. .....
Natural Nutrition Fitting in fruit
3. To boost the number of fruit servings you eat each day, slice fresh fruit or spoon soaked dried fruit onto morning muesli. Snack on grapes, dried fruit and berries, and eat an apple or banana midmorning or afternoon. Follow meals with a fruit salad, baked or poached fruit, or treat yourself to pieces of fruit dipped in fine dark melted chocolate. .....
Natural Nutrition Color combos
4. A rainbow of colors on the plate ensures you are getting a good intake of plant chemicals. Naturally deep green, yellow, and red foods contain antioxidant carotenoids that boost immunity and offer protection against heart disease, cancer, DNA damage, and age-related sight problems. Include peppers, broccoli, spinach, sweet potatoes, carrots, and pumpkin in your diet, plus extravirgin olive oil to aid absorption. .....
Natural Nutrition Fresh is best
5. Choose ripe, seasonal fruit and vegetables and grains in their whole form to ensure maximum flavor while retaining vitamins and minerals, antioxidant compounds, and other plant nutrients that are destroyed by processing. .....
Natural Nutrition Grow your own
6. The best way to ensure the freshest, most flavorful organic fruit and vegetables is to grow them yourself. Even a city balcony can provide a good supply of tomatoes, salad leaves, herbs, and soft fruit. .....
Natural Nutrition Increasing variety
7. Diversity is the key to a healthy diet, since no one food can provide all the nutrients and antioxidants the body needs. Be adventurous and introduce new foods when you can. .....
Natural Nutrition Think like a vegetarian
8. Plant foods contain such lifeenhancing properties that long-term vegetarians are 20 percent less likely to die prematurely than meat eaters. You don’t have to become a vegetarian to reap the benefits. Serve meals with two or three vegetables and salads on the side, and add extra vegetables to dishes such as stir-fries, casseroles, and soups. .....
Natural Nutrition Resensitize your tastebuds
9. If your diet majors on slimming foods and processed meals, you might be amazed by the taste of fresh produce. Rediscover the difference by sampling organic carrots and butter, sourcing milk from specialbreed cows and seeking out meat that has been raised and hung well. Rid your kitchen of products such as cookies and potato chips, storebought cakes and pies, margarine, and low-fat foods, all of which have long lists of unwanted ingredients. .....
Natural Nutrition Ditch dieting
10. Change the way you think about food and you need never worry about dieting again. Eating mostly fresh, seasonal fare frees you from faddy diets and prevents the yoyoing weight loss and gain that often accompanies dieting (and, dermatologists state, contributes to aged-looking skin). Instead of obsessing over the scales, judge your weight by how well your clothes fit. .....
Natural Nutrition Cut down on calories
11. If you are carrying excess weight and it won’t budge, it may be because you now need fewer calories. Over 50s who aren’t active need 200 fewer calories per day than those who lead a very physically active life. Adjust your diet to accommodate your slowing metabolism, for example, by reducing portion size rather than by cutting out foods. .....
Natural Nutrition Appetite adaptations
12. As you age, you may find you can’t tolerate large portions. Increase the amount of exercise you get to boost appetite: aim for 30 minutes a day. Make sure that what you do eat contains plenty of protein, vitamins, and minerals, since these nutritional needs don’t decline with the years. .....
Natural Nutrition Find more folate
13. Older people with low levels of folate have noticeably more memory problems than those whose diet is rich in this plant nutrient, according to one study. To keep mind and memory sharp, make sure you eat some folate-rich, green leafy vegetables and citrus fruit every day. .....
Natural Nutrition Choosing good carbs
14. Good carbohydrates are unrefined, rich in nutrients and fiber, high in flavor, and keep you feeling satisfied for hours. Aim for six servings a day if you are not very active; up to nine if you do more exercise. Choose brown and wild rices, oats, seeded wholemeal loaves, wholewheat pasta. Even a homebaked cake such as lemon cake made with polenta and pistachios supplies good carbs. If you’re used to fresh home-cooked food, bad carbs are obvious because they don’t taste good: chewy white bread, soggy processed quiche and pizza bases, sugary breakfast cereals, cake that never goes off. Avoid them altogether. .....
Natural Nutrition Potato pleasures
15. Women who eat fries twice a week increase their risk of contracting type-2 diabetes, a major disease affecting people post middle age, according to one study. Opt instead for organic potatoes baked, boiled in their skins or mashed with garlic and olive oil. Alternatively, try flavorful sweet potatoes. .....
Natural Nutrition Eat whole grains
16. Fiber-rich whole grains are a particularly good food choice as we age. In one study, people over 60 who ate the most whole grains were less likely to suffer metabolic syndrome, a group of symptoms implicated in heart disease and diabetes. They were slimmer, too. Whole grains are also rich in B vitamins and magnesium. Brown rice, for example, contains double the magnesium of white rice. A magnesium-rich diet is also essential for bone density. Choose organic to avoid pesticide residue. .....
Natural Nutrition Try ancient grains
17. Give unusual grains space in your diet: try baking with spelt flour, making salads using quinoa, and planning breakfast around oats. Many nutritionists feel these overlooked grains are particularly well adapted to the human digestive system. .....
Natural Nutrition Source good bread
18. Home-baked bread warm from the oven is a foodie’s ultimate everyday treat, dunked in a little pungent olive or nut oil or spread with a little good butter. Try to wean yourself off supermarket bakeries and additive-loaded sliced loaves.Search for an artisan baker who sells bread that goes hard after a day (a good freshness test). Check out sour-dough loaves, rye breads, mixes with grains and seeds, and Middle Eastern flat breads. When you have time, buy fresh once or twice a day, as is traditional in France. Or bake your own overnight in a bread machine. .....
Natural Nutrition Fat facts
19. Make sure your fat intake comes mostly from oily fish, avocados, walnuts and other nuts, extra-virgin olive oil, and flaxseed oil. Dietary fat is essential with age, especially if you have a small appetite or are frail. It speeds absorption of fatsoluble vitamins and carotenoids, offers energy and essential fatty acids, brings flavor, especially in meat, and reduces inflammation in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Monounsaturated fats boost the health of the arteries and heart by increasing “good” and reducing “bad” cholesterol. They also decrease risk of breast cancer, according to a Swedish study. “Trans” fats are oils that have been hydrogenated to extend shelf-life. They have no nutritional benefits, increase risk of coronary heart disease, and have also been linked with cancer and skin disease. They are found only in processed foods, and aren’t always labeled, so avoid them by avoiding processed foods. .....
Natural Nutrition Eat butter
20. Go to the refrigerator now and throw away low-fat spreads and margarine. They taste nasty and are packed with additives you should avoid. Substitute organic butter—look for local farmhouse butter, which has a distinct crumbly texture. Use only a scraping if you are worried about the health risks of saturated fat, or drizzle on extravirgin olive oil instead. .....
Natural Nutrition Selecting good sugar
21. For baking and to scatter over bitter food and drinks choose dark sugars: brown sugar contains molasses, a good source of iron, and is so flavorful a little goes a long way when stirred into deserts, oatmeal, and drinks. By adding the sugar yourself, you can monitor how much you are taking on board. Buy organic and fair-trade if desired. Honey is a sweetener and an antioxidant with fantastic health-giving properties, used in hospitals for wound healing. Studies suggest it may help prevent heart disease and offer anticavity protection for teeth. .....
Natural Nutrition Avoid artificial sweeteners
22. Many popular artificial sweeteners contain ingredients that may be harmful to your health. Check for aspartame (E951), which produces the toxin methanol, which the body can process only in small amounts, and has been associated with headaches and menstrual problems. Saccharin (E954) has been linked with bladder cancer. Acesulfame K (E950) has also been linked with cancer, while sorbitol (E420) and mannitol (E421) are associated with bloating. .....
Natural Nutrition Discovering hidden sugar
23. It’s difficult to keep to the World Health Organization’s recommended daily limit for sugar (no more than 10 percent of your daily food intake) when it appears in so many forms in packaged, processed foods. If any of the following come near the top of an ingredients list or the product contains more than one in addition to sugar, leave that breakfast cereal, ketchup, or diet food on the shelf:
  • dextrose
  • glucose
  • corn syrup
  • sucrose
  • fructose
  • HFCS (high fructose corn syrup) .....
  • Natural Nutrition Protein provision
    24. Aim for two servings of protein a day, from meat and fish, legumes, nuts, or dairy produce. In one osteoporosis study, people with the highest intake of protein maintained bone mineral density significantly better than those who ate less. .....
    Natural Nutrition Fish for health
    25. Oily fish such as salmon, sardines, and mackerel are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which protect brain and eye health, protect the heart, can ease depression and guard against inflammation that can cause stiff, painful joints. Aim for at least two portions a week. .....
    Natural Nutrition Which fish is best
    26. Opt for small fish lower down the food chain, such as sardines, herring, and anchovies, as well as wild salmon. These contain 16 times fewer PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls—cancer-causing neurological toxins that accumulate in the body) than farmed salmon according to a study by the Environmental Working Group. Larger carnivorous fish higher up the food chain have been found to contain high levels of environmental pollutants, including mercury, dioxins, and PCBs. .....
    Natural Nutrition Red meat for iron
    27. Red meat is a particularly good source of iron, which older people tend to be deficient in. Serve meat with green leafy vegetables and a glass of fresh orange juice to maximize absorption. .....
    Natural Nutrition Choose free range
    28. Beef from herds that graze on pasture contains more healthy fats than meat from animals fed on dry, sometimes additive-laced feeds. .....
    Natural Nutrition Find a good butcher
    29. Look for a butcher who sources locally and chalks up which farmer (and even which field) the stock comes from. A good butcher often makes his own sausages or buys them in from artisan producers. He will be able to recommend particular cuts and offer meat that is in season, such as game and spring lamb, and tends not to offer prepacked portions: vacuum-packed meat doesn’t look or taste so good. Free-range beef also contains a good amount of antioxidant selenium. Organic farmers usually keep fewer animals per acre and so their animal husbandry tends to be better. Artificial hormones and other additives are banned. This leads to better-tasting meat. If you are concerned by the expense, opt for cheaper cuts for stewing and other forms of long cooking, or eat less. Try game, such as rabbit, pheasant and quail, which tend to be free range. .....
    Natural Nutrition Eating poultry
    30. Chicken is a good source of selenium, involved in DNA repair and cancer protection; niacin, which helps protect brain function as we age; and vitamin B6 for energy and healthy heart and blood vessels. Choose free-range chicken fed an organic diet. To seal in flavor and moisture leave the skin on while cooking. .....
    Natural Nutrition Leave processed meat on the shelf
    31. For colon health don’t include a great deal of processed or cured meat in your diet, urges a Canadian study. This includes bacon, hot dogs, and salami. Preservative nitrites in salami and “pressed ham” have been associated with increased risk of colon disease. In the same study, choosing fresh red meat or chicken breast seemed to lower the risk of disease by 39 percent. .....
    Natural Nutrition Veggie protein
    32. In recent years many research studies have underscored the health benefits of plant-derived protein as we age. Include nuts, seeds, and fiber-rich legumes, such as black beans, in your diet daily for protection against heart disease and stroke. .....
    Shopping for Food
    33. How you shop determines how well you eat. If you buy locally from farmers’ markets and pick-your-own farms, specialty butchers, bakers, and fish sellers, artisinal cheese shops and good delis, the produce that reaches your plate will be full of flavor as well as fresh and nutritious. .....
    Shopping for Food Organic farming
    34. Food that is certified organic comes from farms run by people who are more likely to care about the health of our soil, water, and air, the living conditions of livestock, and the flora and fauna around the farm. Produce of organic farming is less likely to have trace residues of pesticides, artificial fertilizers, and antibiotics, and is guaranteed free from GM (genetically modified) material. Organic certifiers permit only a small range of artificial additives to be used in processed foods while more than 500 may be used in nonorganic foods. .....
    Shopping for Food Nutrients boost
    35. Organic farming seems to boost nutrient content. A recent UK study found 71 percent more omega-3 fats (best for the heart) in organic than conventionally farmed milk. In another study, organic spinach was shown to have 100 percent more iron and manganese than regular crops; deficiencies of both minerals are common in later life. The antioxidant vitamin E has been found to be as much as 50 percent more potent in organic crops. .....
    Shopping for Food Organic priorities
    36. Add a few organic staples to your shopping cart each week if you can’t afford to convert to a totally organic diet. American magazine Worth the Money suggests prioritizing the following foods:
  • dairy foods
  • poultry and eggs
  • meat
  • apples and pears
  • raspberries and strawberries
  • cherries
  • nectarines and peaches
  • nonAmerican grapes
  • celery and peppers
  • potatoes .....
  • Shopping for Food Eating local
    37. Faced with the choice between organic produce from the other side of the world and locally produced nonorganic foods, go for the local option to reduce environmental pollutants resulting from transport that may have an aging effect on body systems. Local food should not have spent too long in storage and so may contain more vitamins. .....
    Shopping for Food Read the labels
    38. Examine the ingredients listing of every item you pick off the shelf. If you don’t understand any of the words or chemical formulae, replace the product and look for one with a shorter ingredients list, and one which you don’t need a Master’s degree to decipher. .....
    Shopping for Food Visit farmers’ markets
    39. With the best produce from miles around gathered in one place for a day, a farmers’ market is as much a social occasion as a shopping opportunity. Enjoy meeting the producers and quiz them about their use of pesticides, antibiotics, and methods of animal husbandry. Ask how you tell whether produce is fresh, and inquire after cooking and juicing tips. Don’t go with recipes in mind, rather, pick up what looks best on the day and let that inspire the day’s main meal. .....
    Shopping for Food Follow your senses
    40. At the farmers’ market, be tempted by your nose and eyes into trying something new every week maybe an artisanal cheese, a type of fish or sausage you’ve never tasted, local flower honey, or an old variety of apple. Ask stall-holders for preparation tips and to recommend good ingredient combinations. .....
    Shopping for Food Pick your own
    41. In soft fruit season, head out to a pick-your-own farm to harvest strawberries, raspberries, and other delicate fruit that doesn’t travel well when ripe. Eat as many as you can fresh, then freeze or preserve the rest for a dose of cheering sunshine during dark winter months. This makes a great bonding family outing that appeals to children and grandchildren of all ages. .....
    Shopping for Food Source direct from the farm
    42. Cut down on food miles and enjoy the destressing effect of knowing exactly where your food comes from by buying direct from a farm. Look for meat freezer packs and programs that deliver to your doorstep. .....
    Shopping for Food Champion specialty
    43. varieties Local breeds have lost out in past decades to livestock that is cheap to raise, but bland to the palate. Help revive taste history by joining the increasing numbers of chefs and shoppers returning to older, more unusual varieties, which are often more suited to regional climates and cuisines. Rare-breed meat is more likely to have been raised on family farms in free-range conditions with a varied diet, and to have been slaughtered humanely and properly hung. For all these reasons it tastes rich and well-textured, and offers a good balance between lean meat and flavor-enhancing fat. .....
    Shopping for Food Buy fair
    44. Seek out fairly traded goods for a daily feel-good fix. Feeling uplifted by your ability to make a difference in the world every time you drink a cup of coffee or eat a banana is an easy stress-beater. People who retain a positive state of mind as they age live longer, happier lives. .....
    Shopping for Food Special occasions
    45. When planning a meal to celebrate a birthday or anniversary why not turn to local producers to impress your guests? Put together hampers of cured meat, smoked fish, cheeses, fruit, and bread loaves and head out to a nearby nature spot. .....
    Shopping for Food Supermarket savvy
    46. Get to know how supermarkets work so it’s easier to resist the lure of unhealthy processed foods. Fresh produce milk, fruit and vegetables, fish and meat counters are usually situated around the perimeter of the store. Venture into the center, where snack foods and preprepared meals lurk, for olive oil and wine only when you are ready to leave. .....
    Shopping for Food Take your own bag
    47. Reduce the amount of plastics accumulating in the environment and the toxins created by their manufacture and disposal by taking cloth bags and wicker baskets on shopping trips instead of using plastic bags. Keep a fold-out string bag in your handbag for carrying any spontaneous lunch hour purchases. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits
    48. How you eat helps turn back the clock. Missing breakfast, snacking on the run, and grazing while watching TV are all associated with eating excess calories and foods low in vital nutrients. Most of all, they preclude the joy of sharing food with people you love. Those who have a close network of family and friends to share mealtimes with tend to live longer, more fulfilled lives. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Rituals of eating
    49. Think of meals as sacrosanct times during the day when you stop and relax. Make sure you set aside enough time for food preparation, eating, and cleaning up. Eat sitting at the table to aid digestion and to allow you to savor the texture, color, and scent of food: enjoying food has as much to do with these sensations as with taste. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Setting the table
    50. To give mealtimes a sense of occasion, clear from the table everything except food-related items. Put away work files, homework, and unpaid bills.Throw over a clean tablecloth, place some fresh flowers or a candle in the center, add a pitcher of water with ice and lemon, and set cutlery, glasses, and napkins. Choose coordinating plates and warm them before serving food. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Stop multi tasking
    51. Stop doing anything other than eating at mealtimes. Research suggests that people who eat while on the internet, working, driving, or chatting on the phone tend to eat more than those who eat without distraction simply because they are not focused on the act of eating. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Ban TV dinners
    52. The first rule of natural eating is to turn off the TV, because it diverts attention from the quality of your food and the quantity you are eating. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Put down your fork
    53. Between mouthfuls put down your knife and fork. If your fingers feel restless, place them on your lap, palms facing upward. Enjoy the sensation of chewing and appreciate the release of flavors. Chewing and savoring food not only aids digestion, it turns a meal from a period of processing, where speed is the focus, to a time of delight. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Count each chew
    54. Chew each mouthful until every last vestige of taste has been given up and the food is small enough to swallow easily. Chewing triggers the release of enzymes and fluids that ensure easy and proper digestion. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Eating meditation
    55. Don’t miss out on the spiritrefueling possibilities of eating with all your senses engaged. Before sitting down to eat, make sure you are hungry. Sit upright, close your eyes, and focus within. Open your eyes and look at your plate, as if for the first time: examine the blend of colors and textures, steam rising or beads of oil. When other thoughts arise, let them pass; bring your awareness back to the food in front of you. As you cut and spear, appreciate the textures: crisp, tender, oozing. Close your eyes, place a morsel in your mouth and feel the sensations as flavors activate tastebuds on various parts of your tongue. After finishing, sit in silence briefly and concentrate on your digestion. Visualize food circulating through your body systems and being transformed into energy. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits No more grazing
    56. Nibbling mindlessly between meals (and finishing up leftovers) is a surefire way to take on board calories without enjoying the experience of eating. If you want a snack, dedicate time to it. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Write it down
    57. If you’re unsure how healthy your diet is, start a food journal. Every day write down exactly what you eat, and when. After a week, scrutinize your results and try to recognize patterns. Do you slip into bad habits midafternoon or when you get home from work? Are your cupboards packed with processed foods because you go to the supermarket when you are hungry or accompanied by kids? .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Sharing meals
    58. Food is most pleasurable when shared. Aim to eat at least once a day with those who share your home, or with friends if you live alone. You might only be able to sit down together for breakfast, but insist on it, even if it only lasts a few minutes. At mealtimes, problems can be discussed, opinions expressed, relationships worked on, jokes enjoyed. Once a week try to organize a more formal meal with more than one course and wine, where children are expected to stay at the table and converse. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Stock the pantry
    59. Amass enough healthy staples to be able to throw together a healthy, tasty pasta dish in a hurry. Keep onion and garlic in the vegetable rack; extra-virgin olive oil, canned plum tomatoes and tomato purée, anchovies, and good spaghetti in the cupboard; black olives and parmesan cheese in the fridge. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Brush your teeth
    60. Brushing teeth after meals has been shown in a Japanese study to be a habit associated with people who keep their weight at a healthy level. .....
    Healthy Eating Habits Give thanks
    61. Even if you don’t say grace at mealtimes, think about all the people who made it possible for the food to reach your plate: farmers, transport workers, energy suppliers. Appreciate the interdependence of lives across the globe. .....
    What to Eat When
    62. Listen to your body as well as your lifestyle when planning what to eat. Some of us do better on three meals a day, others prefer smaller portions more often. Make sure you have enough time between meals to relish the feeling of hunger that accompanies an empty stomach. Routine and regularity are the key to good nutritional health. .....
    What to Eat When Why breakfast matters
    63. Kickstart the day with a good portion of the nutrients your body needs — without fuel body and mind won’t cope with all your demands. Choose foods that offer a sustained energy boost: oatmeal, homemade muesli, wholemeal toast, eggs, yogurt with fruit, nuts, and seeds. .....
    What to Eat When Fresh orange juice
    64. Squeeze it yourself and be sure that the fruit is organic, fairly traded, and not coated in petroleum waxes. Home-pressed orange juice with pulp is a good source of potassium, folate, vitamin C, and carotenoids shown to reduce risk of an inflammatory condition that leads to rheumatoid arthritis by as much as 40 percent. .....
    What to Eat When Cardamom oatmeal
    65. This recipe is inspired by a breakfast served at a food stall in the healing field at the Glastonbury festival in England. Serves four.
  • large mug organic jumbo oats
  • 2 mugs organic semiskimmed milk
  • generous handful unsulfured dried apricots
  • 8 cardamoms
  • maple syrup, to serve
    Put the oats and milk in a large pan. Wash and finely chop the apricots and add. Bash the cardamoms to split them, then add to the pan. Slowly bring to the boil, stirring with a wooden spoon. Allow to bubble for a few minutes, then turn off and leave to cool for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with maple syrup. .....
  • What to Eat When Go to work on an egg
    66. Eggs are always a good way to start the day for a high-quality protein hit, containing antioxidant selenium, choline for memory, and vitamin D, which helps calcium absorption and boosts immunity. .....
    What to Eat When Keep chickens
    67. The best eggs are freshly gathered from your own chickens. Even a small urban garden can be home to a couple of hens. If you don’t want to construct your own coop and run, visit www.omlet.us for its awardwinning “eglu”—a small, podlike coop, delivered complete with two organic laying hens, a fox-proof run, and the lure of 12 eggs per week. .....
    What to Eat When Don’t snack after exercise
    68. A post-workout nutrition bar or glucose drink may seem tempting, but don’t succumb if you want to keep trim. Go for green or camomile tea and an apple instead. .....
    What to Eat When Spice up your life
    69. Buy a book about Indian cuisine, grind your own curry powders and garam masalas, and aim to cook your own once a week. India has the lowest incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in the world. Researchers attribute this to curry, which almost always contains turmeric, the main constituent of which, curcumin, seems to slow the progress of neurodegeneration. It is also a helpful anti-inflammatory for swollen joints and has been associated with healthy cells. Other fabulously antiaging ingredients in the curry mix include ginger, garlic, chillies, fenugreek seeds, tomatoes, and onions. .....
    What to Eat When Homemade muesli
    70. Making your own muesli allows you to pander to personal preference. You can include antiaging seeds and nuts and leave out the ingredients you dislike.
  • organic jumbo oats
  • walnuts
  • almonds
  • Brazil and cashew nuts
  • sunflower seeds
  • pumpkin seeds
  • pine nuts
  • sesame seeds
    1. Into a large bowl empty a bag of jumbo oats. Stir in as many of the nuts and seeds listed above as you wish. Pour the muesli into a large jar and seal tightly. Store in a cool dark place.
    2. Each morning spoon out a bowlful of muesli. Add chopped fresh or soaked dry fruit to taste kiwi for morning pep or traditional apple then top up with semiskimmed milk or yogurt. .....
  • What to Eat When Adopt a Mediterranean diet
    71. Benefit from this health-enhancing way of eating by building your daily diet around antioxidant-loaded fresh fruit and vegetables, highly nutritive whole grains and nuts, and heart-friendly olive oil and fish. In a recent study those who ate Mediterranean for just three months reduced their risk of cardiovascular disease by 15 percent. .....
    What to Eat When Eat with the seasons
    72. Ayurveda, the Indian system of natural healthcare, is also referred to as the art of longevity. It teaches that body and mind become better balanced if we consume the produce of the seasons. Doing so aligns us with the rhythms of the natural world, echoing the Earth’s changes as the globe turns. .....
    What to Eat When Spring clean
    73. With the first buds of spring, make changes in your diet and introduce lighter foods that are easy to digest. Lighten up by easing back on dairy foods and rich, oily meals, and gradually introduce more salads and bitter leaves, light broths, sprouted seeds, and raw foods into your diet. .....
    What to Eat When Summer foods
    74. In the heat of summer, nature offers juicy fruit and water-laden vegetables to cool and hydrate the body, so take advantage of cucumber, zucchini, celery, watercress, and flush-reducing watermelon. Major on chilled soups, cool juices, and frozen yogurt. Make fresh mixedleaf salads to keep active bones strong and calm the nerves with their sedative qualities. .....
    What to Eat When Summer salad
    75. Take large bunches of several leafy seasonal herbs, such as mint, parsley, coriander, and sorrel. Wash, chop, and dress with lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Slice feta cheese and stir in. Chill before serving. .....
    What to Eat When Fall foods
    76. In the season of change, start eating more sweet, astringent, and bittertasting foods, such as pumpkin, beets, and parsnip, suggests Ayurveda. Keep the food light and easily digestible it’s not winter yet. .....
    What to Eat When Root salad
    77. Savor the earthy sweetness of carotenoid-rich carrots and red beets in a robust, clean-tasting coldseason salad. Serves four.
  • 4 carrots
  • 2 beets (uncooked)
  • generous handful sunflower seeds
  • balsamic vinegar, to taste
    Grate the carrots and beets. Toast the sunflower seeds and toss into the salad while warm. Dress with a little balsamic vinegar. .....
  • What to Eat When Winter warmers
    78. Ayurveda suggests we build in more sustaining, warming food in winter: go for hearty casseroles and roast joints, baked dishes based on dried legumes, and root vegetables. .....
    What to Eat When Vegetarian roast
    79. Roast winter vegetables, such as carrot, parsnip, red beets, and whole heads of garlic. Serve topped with grilled goat’s cheese, or as wholemeal bread sandwiches. .....
    What to Eat When Cheering treats
    80. Don’t be scared of the occasional treat: a mood-lifting glass of champagne with lunch, for example. Other treats include:
  • 70 percent cocoa, solid organic chocolate
  • real ice cream from a dairy farm
  • gourmet honey drizzled over toast or yogurt
  • fine cheeses served with quince paste or ripe figs
  • freshly made pancakes
  • freshly popped corn
  • homemade fruit scones served with good jam and heavy cream .....
  • What to Eat When Waist watching
    81. Enjoying a treat early in the day seems to have less effect on the waistline. Alternatively, do more exercise to keep your waist in check. .....
    What to Eat When Try fasting
    82. In all the great religions, fasting is a tool of meditation, used as a way of reining in the excesses of body and mind. If you are in good health, you might like to have a juice and water-only day once every season. Alternatively, give up something you crave for a set period of time, and notice how after a while the cravings cease and your mind feels calmer. .....
    Age defying Superfood
    83. Research is showing us that some foods are particularly effective at keeping at bay the body’s aging mechanisms. Many of these superfoods are fruit and vegetables famed for their antioxidant powers—the more of these you can weave into your day, the better you protect body and brain from the ravages of time. .....
    Age defying Superfood Rewrite your shopping list
    84. A recent report in the British Medical Journal suggested that eating certain key foods every day could boost cardiovascular health and even increase life expectancy by up to 6½ years. The items to keep a ready supply of are vegetables, fruit, garlic, almonds, wine, fish (twice a week), and dark chocolate. .....
    Age defying Superfood Graze on grapes
    85. Keep black grapes handy to pick at. The red coloring contains very potent antioxidants effective in maintaining youthful arteries. They are also a source of ellagic acid, associated with cancer-prevention. .....
    Age defying Superfood Pomegranate power
    86. The succulent seeds and juice of this fruit contain very high levels of antioxidant polyphenols that seem to protect against many diseases of aging, including ailments of the heart and blood vessels. They also seem to inhibit the growth of prostate and breast cancer cells. .....
    Age defying Superfood Cultivate peppers
    87. Buy young pepper plants and nurture in pots through the summer ready to harvest in the fall. Like pumpkin and other red, orange, and yellow fruit and vegetables, peppers contain the carotenoid beta-cryptoxanthin, which can help cut the risk of a precursor disease to rheumatoid arthritis by up to 40 percent. Red peppers contain three times more vitamin C than citrus fruit. .....
    Age defying Superfood Eat more berries
    88. Eating dark red or purple berries boosts memory function. Blackcurrants and boysenberries are rich in the antioxidant flavonoid anthocyanins and seem to fight cell and DNA damage, which can contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s and cancer. Blackcurrants, blackberries, bilberrries, and blueberries benefit aging eyes and capillary walls, too. Eat fresh berries in season. Out of season try frozen or freeze-dried. .....
    Age defying Superfood Enjoy nuts
    89. Walnuts are renowned in Chinese medicine as the longevity fruit. As well as snacking on fresh shelled nuts, try using the oil in cooking and salad dressings. Packed with heartprotecting antioxidants and fats, walnut oil has a nutty flavor that works well with potatoes and other root vegetables. Peanuts share their cholesterol-lowering properties and are also linked to a decreased risk of heart disease. Eat a handful of almonds each day for their healthy monounsaturated fats, which are associated with a lowered risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. .....
    Age defying Superfood Snack on seeds
    90. Just a fistful of seeds a day is immensely protective, since they contain protein, useful amounts of minerals and fatty acids essential for joint and prostate health. Add pumpkin, flaxseeds (linseeds), sesame and sunflower seeds to muesli, scatter over salads and keep ready-mixed packets in your desk to dip into when energy levels drop. .....
    Age defying Superfood Probiotic booster
    91. A pot of organic live natural yogurt each day can help boost immunity. A Swedish study shows those who get a daily dose of the good bacteria, or probiotics, found in live or “bio” yogurt are less likely to call in sick than colleagues who don’t. It’s also good for digestive health and strong bones. If you find yogurt unpalatable, try drizzling over organic runny honey, adding chopped pistachio nuts, or a spilling of fresh pomegranate seeds. .....
    Age defying Superfood Eat fish twice a week
    92. Dining on fish two to four times a week reduces the risk of heart disease by 14 percent; eaten just once a week it can slow mental decline by 10 percent a year in older people, studies suggest. As well as providing omega-3 fatty acids, oily fish offer antioxidant selenium, vitamin D, which seems to protect against forms of cancer common in older age, and magnesium, necessary for strong bones. The fatty acids in fish oils also counteract the effects on the heart of air pollutants, which increase risk of heart disease. .....
    Age defying Superfood Cook with garlic
    93. Valuable for lowering blood pressure, reducing cholesterol, preventing blood clots, and giving the immune system a powerful boost, eating 2–3 cloves of garlic daily can reduce by a quarter the risk of stroke and heart attack. Pound the cloves in a mortar and pestle or slice finely with a knife; in a garlic crusher cloves can take on a metallic tang. Use garlic fresh in salad dressings or add right at the end of cooking to ensure valuable compounds aren’t destroyed by heat. .....
    Age defying Superfood Switch to olive oil
    94. You can substitute olive oil for other cooking oils, use it in salad dressings, drizzle it over crusty bread, or use it as a massage and body oil. A diet rich in olive oil is associated with a 25 percent reduced risk of coronary heart disease. Extra-virgin olive oil contains most anti-inflammatory and clot-preventing antioxidant phenols. Its main constituent, oleic acid, helps maintain healthy levels of cholesterol and seems to inhibit a gene that stimulates breast cancer cells. It’s no wonder that the Mediterranean diet, with olive oil always on the menu, is associated with long life. .....
    Age defying Superfood Keep ketchup on the table
    95. Concentrated cooked tomato products, such as ketchup and purée, contain remarkably effective amounts of lycopene, the antioxidant red pigment found in red fruit and vegetables. In a largescale European study, men with the highest intake of lycopene-rich foods were half as likely to suffer from a heart attack than those whose diets featured the lowest amount. Lycopene protects the heart and is good for blood pressure, suggests a recent study, and is also known to combat prostate cancer. The darker the fruit, the more lycopene it contains. Aim for a mighty 10 servings of fresh and cooked tomatoes a week, making sure they are organic: organic ketchup contains 83 percent more lycopene than nonorganic. .....
    Age defying Superfood Salsa with everything
    96. Capsaicin, the property that gives chillies heat, seems to kill liver and prostate cancer cells, studies suggest. Chilli peppers also protect against heart disease, high blood pressure, blood clots and high cholesterol. To make salsa, chop finely and stir together red onion, diced fresh tomatoes, cilantro, lime juice, and enough of your favorite variety of chilli to achieve the heat level you prefer. Keep it in the fridge to accompany eggs at breakfast, omelets at lunch, and to pep up grilled meat or fish. .....
    Age defying Superfood Substitute sweet potato
    97. Once a week or more substitute orange-fleshed sweet potato for your regular carbohydrate: try baking, roasting, or frying. The color indicates the benefits: carotenoid pigment safeguards the skin and eyes as we age, and people with raised levels of beta-carotene show a reduced risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. Vitamins C and E in the potatoes boost the carotenoids’ antioxidant capabilities. .....
    Age defying Superfood Broccoli for breasts
    98. Boost breast health by eating one portion of steamed broccoli or other cruciferous greens, such as cabbage, kale, and Brussels sprouts, most days. This seems to keep breast tissue healthy and helps rid the body of an estrogen linked with the development of breast cancer. Broccoli is also high in bonebuilding calcium and folate, essential for artery health. .....
    Age defying Superfood Eat your greens
    99. The aging brain stays sharper if you eat greens, according to a recent study. People who ate most folaterich leafy greens and citrus fruit stayed significantly sharper and had better memories than those who ate fewer. Food sources might be more effective than taking a supplement. Other research shows that those who ate foods rich in folate reduced their risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas those who took a supplement didn’t. .....
    Age defying Superfood Garnish with herbs
    100. Adding fresh herbs to dishes has been shown in research by the US Department of Agriculture to add more antioxidant properties to meals than the fruit, vegetable, and berry ingredients. Maintain a constant supply of fresh basil, parsley, and coriander by nurturing plants in pots in the kitchen. Plant a bay tree in a pot outside, and raise a rosemary bush and sage plants for marinades and stuffing roasts. .....
    Age defying Superfood Citrus fruit salad
    101. Slice and mix together oranges, strawberries, and ripe mangoes (for vitamin C), peaches and fresh or dried apricots (for beta-carotene), and tangerines (for zeaxanthin), all essential for eye health as we age. Drizzle over orange juice and spike with Cointreau for special occasions. Age-related macular degeneration is a prime cause of blindness in the over 55s, and people with a higher intake of these nutrients are significantly less likely to develop the condition. .....
    Age defying Superfood Serve organic milk
    102. Calcium for bone health seems to be best absorbed from dairy products. Select organic milk because, according to EU studies, it contains 70 percent more omega-3 fatty acids and higher levels of vitamins A and E than nonorganic milk. It also has 75 percent more beta-carotene and two to three times higher levels of the antioxidant plant chemicals lutein and zeaxanthin. Buy milk in a carton rather than a bottle because nutrients are lost on exposure to light. Older women should drink four glasses of low-fat organic milk a day to help guard against osteoporosis. If you find this quantity a tall order, supplement with yogurt and cheese. .....
    Age defying Superfood Daily chocolate
    103. It’s healthy to enjoy fine chocolate in moderation thanks to the amazingly antioxidant polyphenols it contains. Eating chocolate daily can reduce risk of circulation problems by 27 percent, lower blood pressure, increase “good” cholesterol and inhibit blood clotting, suggest studies. Choose dark chocolate rich in cocoa solids (look for 70 percent or over) and stick to moderate amounts. Try making your own chocolate drinks with fairly traded cocoa and just enough dark sugar to sweeten to taste. Milk chocolate bars containing sugars and hydrogenated oils don’t share the benefits. .....
    Food Away from Home
    104. Dining and snacking away from home need not be a nutritional nightmare if you follow a few simple rules and keep a good stock of healthy, antiaging foods in your handbag or on your desk at work. .....
    Food Away from Home Midmorning hunger
    105. If you need a pick-me-up to tide you over until lunchtime, reach for a banana, a few dried prunes, or a handful of nuts and seeds to stabilize energy highs and lows.
  • Brazil nuts will boost your levels of antioxidant selenium.
  • Walnuts are a good source of oil to ease inflammation.
  • Pistachio nuts are rich in cholesterol-clobbering phytosterols.
  • Sunflower seeds and cashew nuts help keep blood pressure healthy.
  • Organic carrots: their pigment may reduce the risk of arthritis.
  • Dried cranberries are a source of antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E. .....
  • Food Away from Home Beating the p m slump
    106. If your eyes start to close midafternoon, go and breathe in some fresh air without stoppping at the vending machine en route. When you get back to your desk, drink a reviving cup of peppermint tea and snack on one of the energy boosters. .....
    Food Away from Home Emergency rations
    107. Carry the following in your bag for times when hunger or thirst strike on the run: sachets of green tea, a bottle of mineral water, an apple, small pack of raisins, easy-peel satsuma, and oat cakes. .....
    Food Away from Home Carry an apple
    108. The ultimate portable health food, apples really do keep the doctor away, suggest researchers at Cornell University, because they contain some of the highest levels of the flavonoid quercetin, a potent antioxidant plant pigment. Red apples provide the most. Flavonoidrich foods also have antiviral, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and seem to protect against heart disease, stroke, bowel cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease. Make sure you eat the skin, where flavonols concentrate. .....
    Food Away from Home Street food
    109. Street food provides some of the freshest, best-tasting snacks: doughnuts fried while you wait then dunked in sugar, roasted nuts from a street vendor, cartons of stir-fried noodles direct from the wok at street markets. Enjoy such high-fat snacks occasionally for the youthinducing joy of eating for pleasure. .....
    Food Away from Home Dining out without
    110. pigging out When eating in restaurants, start with a glass of water and salad. Those who eat greens at the beginning of a meal tend to eat fewer calories in total according to one study. To prevent the feeling of an uncomfortably full stomach, stay away from side dishes and order a main course that entails a lot of handling for small results: a platter of seasonal local seafood is a good source of antioxidant selenium and the tiny portions call for effort of fingers and brain, as does plucking leaves from a globe artichoke to dip in vinaigrette. If you want something sweet to finish, but don’t want to suffer energy dips later, share a dessert. .....
    Food Away from Home Eating outdoors
    111. Food always tastes better outdoors, especially when you have had to work for it by building a fire or walking to a spectacular spot. In the summer, plan picnics, beach barbecues, clam bakes, or garden parties. In winter, throw potatoes and bananas into the embers of a bonfire. .....
    Food Away from Home Perfect picnic gear
    112. Having the right gear makes every picnic more of an occasion, and food tastes better outdoors from real china and glass. Keep the following ready for impromptu outings:
  • wicker picnic basket
  • corkscrew and Swiss army knife
  • cushions for lounging
  • real glasses and cutlery
  • china or enamel plates
  • linen napkins
  • gingham tablecloth
  • plaid picnic blanket
  • ice pack for cooling wine .....
  • Eating from Scratch
    113. When you cook meals from fresh, you can be sure you are preserving all the natural ingredients. Rather than seeing cooking as a chore, regard it as part of a healthy lifestyle, keeping you in touch with the seasons and allowing you to switch off from work and family issues. .....
    Eating from Scratch Quality ingredients
    114. When you choose quality ingredients, preparing food is simple. Leave produce in as fresh a state as you can to enjoy flavors and textures the way nature intended. Eating fruit and vegetables raw and tossed in salads means no vitamins or antiaging plant nutrients are lost in heating. .....
    Eating from Scratch Conserve taste
    115. and nutrients Preserve as much folate and vitamin C as possible in vegetables by steaming rather than boiling. This helps maintain flavor, too. Stirfrying is also good for conserving taste and nutrients. .....
    Eating from Scratch Deli entertaining
    116. Informal entertaining is easy with good deli produce. Offer a platter of locally produced cheeses and cold meats, served with fresh crusty bread and an interesting salad or two or a fresh soup. Buy dessert from a bakery, try organic farm ice cream, or provide a bowl of ripe seasonal fruit. .....
    Eating from Scratch Pack your lunch box
    117. Ditch the deli counter and start making up your own lunch box. It might include:
  • cottage cheese with walnuts and chopped dried apricots
  • homemade humus with crudités: broccoli florets, slices of red pepper and carrots, celery sticks, cucumber, and cherry tomatoes
  • kale coleslaw, with grated apple and carrot
  • open sandwiches on dark rye bread
  • avocado: slice in half, add a splash of balsamic vinegar
  • iron-rich watercress soup made with a little onion and potato
  • tabbouleh, soaked bulgar wheat with olive oil and lemon juice, chopped mint, and parsley .....
  • Eating from Scratch Instant good food
    118. Shift your daily menus to fresh instant food rather than microwaved preprepared meals. Grill asparagus spears for a few minutes on each side and finish with a squeeze of lemon, a little olive oil, and some shavings of parmesan cheese. Asparagus is a good source of folate, essential for memory retention. Other ideas for meals in minutes include:
  • omelets
  • poached salmon
  • grilled sardines
  • steak sandwich
  • smoked mackerel
  • stir-fried noodles and mixed vegetables
  • fresh corn-on-the-cob, boiled and buttered .....
  • Eating from Scratch Effortless meals
    119. Slow cooking can be effortless, too. Throw potatoes in a slow oven a couple of hours ahead of supper time. Serve with cold chicken or cheese and salads. Roast slices of squash and sweet potato, carrots, onions, and whole garlic cloves. Stir into couscous fluffed up with olive oil and butter to help your body absorb the antioxidant nutrients. .....
    Eating from Scratch Slow soups
    120. Roughly chop leeks, onions, celery, and potatoes. Sweat in a little olive oil, then pour over stock, cover, and allow to simmer until soft. Repeat the formula with other combinations of vegetables, try broths, minestrones, and miso soup, make lentil-based dhals or throw in fiber-rich legumes to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. Research shows that supping soup makes us feel full and so stops snacking. Soupeaters lose weight more easily than those who eat the same calories in other forms. .....
    Eating from Scratch Making aïoli
    121. This garlic mayonnaise recipe is more than delicious, it is an exercise in slow cooking and every ingredient is antiaging. Make sure the egg is super fresh.
  • 2 cloves garlic, to taste
  • large pinch sea salt
  • free-range organic egg, separated
  • approximately 7 oz (200 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
  • organic lemon, halved
    1. Using a large mortar and pestle, pound the garlic with the salt until a soft purée is formed. Mix the egg yolk into the purée.
    2. Drop by drop add the oil, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, always in the same direction. Don’t let your mind wander.
    3. Keep stirring in oil until the mixture stands up in firm peaks you may not need it all. Stir in a squeeze of lemon juice and chill. .....
  • Eating from Scratch Keep something
    122. healthy in the fridge Make up simple soups and pasta sauces in advance. Refrigerate so they can be heated up in minutes when you get in from the office or the gym. .....
    Eating from Scratch Sprouting seeds
    123. Sprouted seeds are living foods. Buy a sprouter and harvest mung beans, alfalfa, mustard, and cress for an easy-to-digest energy boost. They are packed with protein, enzymes, minerals and antioxidant vitamins. .....
    Eating from Scratch Free your mind
    124. Instead of slavishly following recipes, close the book after you have cooked a dish a couple of times and experiment focus on flavors, varying vegetables and herbs to adapt the dish to suit the changing seasons and personalities of guests. Using your brain keeps it active. .....
    Eating from Scratch Tasty leftovers
    125. Roast an organic chicken or joint of free-range lamb or beef. Enjoy hot. Eat cold with fresh vegetables, salsas, and salads the next day for an instant healthy meal. .....
    Eating from Scratch Colorful stir fries
    126. Stir together finely sliced colorful vegetables: carrots, red onions, red, orange, and yellow peppers, broccoli, and kale. Throw in a handful of sliced almonds and some green beans. Experiment by adding beansprouts, noodles, seaweed, seafood, or tofu. .....
    Eating from Scratch Quick pasta sauce
    127. Toss artichoke hearts and shelled peas in olive oil to warm through then stir into cooked pasta, adding torn fresh basil or mint to garnish. Peas are the richest source of vitamin B¹ and fresh peas have been shown to enhance sleep, raise a jaded appetite, and boost cheerfulness. .....
    Eating from Scratch Summer salads
    128. Make up exciting combinations featuring watercress, barely cooked broccoli, sliced red pepper, and ripe tomatoes, avocado, zucchini slices brushed with olive oil and grilled, grilled goat’s cheese and toasted pine nuts. Dress with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. .....
    Eating from Scratch Youthful salad dressing
    129. Make up in advance and refrigerate to use throughout the week. Cider vinegar is regarded as the essence of youth in some parts of the world.
  • 1 tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp flaxseed or hemp oil
  • 5–6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1–2 tsp runny organic honey
  • pinch herbes de Provence
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
    Place the vinegar in a lidded jar. With a fork, whisk in the flaxseed or hemp oil until amalgamated. Add the olive oil until the taste suits you. Add the mustard, honey, and herbs, and whisk again until smooth. Season to taste. Close lid and refrigerate. Shake before serving. .....
  • Eating from Scratch Homemade freezer foods
    130. This is the answer to effortless healthy home-cooked food when you are too tired to lift a finger. When you do have time, perhaps on a weekend, make up double quantities or more, then freeze your own ready meals. In summer, freeze whole berries to use in winter smoothies, pies, and desserts. .....
    Drinking Water
    131. One of the best and cheapest antiaging tonics is to drink plenty of water. Hydration from within makes your skin look less tired, helps fend off headaches, digestive problems, and tiredness and reduces food cravings. It also boosts concentration, energy levels, and nutrient delivery, as well as flushing toxins from the system. .....
    Drinking Water Water cure
    132. The sensation of thirst declines with age. Make sure you don’t become dehydrated by drinking six to eight glasses of water (about 4 pints/ 2 liters) daily, especially in summer and when working in air-conditioned or centrally heated rooms. .....
    Drinking Water Store in glass
    133. If you buy mineral water choose brands in glass bottles because plastic (especially polycarbonate, with the recycling triangle mark 7) taints the taste of water and may leach the hormone-disrupting chemical bisphenol-A. Store tap water in the fridge in glass or stainless steel. .....
    Drinking Water Still or sparkling
    134. Carbonated water has gotten bad press but a study of Spanish women found it had no effect on bone density. Another study carried out on American cyclists showed that carbonated water has no adverse effects on the digestive system. .....
    Drinking Water Drink enough water
    135. Drink a glass of water after getting up and make another glass the last liquid you sip before bed. When you work, drink often from a glass of water close to your desk and take regular water-cooler breaks to fill up. Keep a bottle of water by your side at the gym. .....
    Drinking Water Soft drinks make you fat
    136. Opt for plain or sparkling water over carbonated sugary drinks. A recent US study showed drinking just one can a day can add 15 lb (7 kg) to a person’s weight over a year. .....
    Drinking Water Citron pressé
    137. Squeeze the juice of half an organic lemon into a glass. Top off with warm or sparkling water and sip for a morning pick-me-up that encourages digestion. .....
    Drinking Water Find out about fluoride
    138. High intake of fluoride may result in bones that become more brittle. Find out from your supplier if your water supply contains fluoride. If it does, you might like to avoid fluoride toothpaste. .....
    Drinking Water Water filters
    139. Use a water filter if it makes water more palatable. Filters that fit into a pitcher screen out heavy metals, such as lead and copper, but might not be effective against some pesticides and nitrates. A reverseosmosis filter installed near the sink is the only way to rid water of fluoride and many pesticides. .....
    Organic Juicing
    140. Juicing fruit and vegetables makes available all the benefits of raw food without time-consuming chewing. If you juice at home you can be creative with combinations and be sure of the provenance of ingredients. Make the most of bags of organic juicing fruit sold cheaply at farmers’ markets. If you find eating breakfast onerous, whizz up pitted, peeled fruit with yogurt, seeds, and nuts for an easy-to-sip smoothie. .....
    Organic Juicing Flush calming drinks
    141. Mix pomegranate juice with freshly squeezed lime juice to cool the body. Alternatively, whizz up a spicy lassi. Blend yogurt with half the amount again of water. Stir in sugar or salt to taste, plus ¼ tsp each of crushed cardamom seeds and ground cinnamon. .....
    Organic Juicing Perk up juices
    142. Juice combinations of fruits and vegetables make the most of their active ingredients:
  • Red grapefruit juice reduces “bad” cholesterol (avoid if on medication).
  • Tomato juice with a shake of celery salt, black pepper, and Worcestershire sauce is a great morning pick-me-up.
  • Carrot, apple, and ginger combine for a spring detox.
  • Celery, beets, spinach, and apple with a squeeze of lemon juice are refreshing in the afternoon.
  • Blackberries with fresh orange juice make a tart start to the day. .....
  • Organic Juicing Specialty juices
    143. For best flavor, look for cloudy specialty apple and pear juices from family orchards that specialize in named local varieties, each with a distinct taste. .....
    Organic Juicing Breakfast smoothies
    144. Berry smoothie: blend 1 container of berries with 2–3 tbsp natural yogurt and top off with cold milk. Garnish with toasted nuts and seeds. Banana-mango breakfast: whizz up the flesh of 1 banana and 1 mango; mix in yogurt to taste and 1 tsp each sesame seeds and flaxseeds (linseeds). .....
    Tonic Brews
    145. Some herbal teas are instantly uplifting and calming against the aging effects of stress and mental overload. Green tea is immune-strengthening and a fine antioxidant as well as good for the heart. Black tea and coffee, once considered a health no-no because of their caffeine content, are now regarded as tonic brews. .....
    Tonic Brews Drink a cup
    146. Researchers from Tokyo Medical University have established that drinking black tea after high-fat meals helps blood circulation. Other research suggests people who drink four or more cups a day halve their risk of heart attack and also reduce high blood pressure. Drinking double this amount has been linked to a reduction in cancer risk. .....
    Tonic Brews Go green
    147. A potent antioxidant, green tea has been found in studies to boost longevity and the immune system, cut risk of heart disease and reduce inflammation. Antibacterial and antiviral, it also helps stimulate the burning of calories according to researchers at the University of Geneva. Drinking more than two cups a day keeps mind and memory sharp with age. Japanese women who drink green tea also have lower risk of breast cancer and better outcomes if they do contract the disease. Aim for three to six cups a day. .....
    Tonic Brews Curry and green tea
    148. When eating Indian-style dishes, have a cup of green tea. Turmeric, a staple ingredient in India curries, and green tea seem to enhance each other’s health-giving properties. .....
    Tonic Brews Try white tea
    149. Although it originates from the same plant as green and black tea, Camellia sinensis, white tea contains more active ingredients, and so potentially more health benefits. Of all tea varieties, white tea is the least processed, which may be the source of its health-giving properties. The young buds are simply steamed and dried after picking, preserving the mix of antioxidant polyphenols. In China it is valued as meditationenhancing, so drink before yoga. .....
    Tonic Brews Spiced tea
    150. Brew tea the Indian way, as chai, to energize and aid digestion. Serves two.
  • 3 cups of water
  • ¼ tsp each crushed cardamom pods, ground cinnamon, freshly ground black pepper, ground ginger
  • 3 tsp black tea leaves semiskimmed milk, to taste
    In a pan bring the water to the boil with the spices. Add the tea and a generous helping of milk, if desired, and bring to the boil again. Steep for 5 minutes, then strain into cups. Chai is traditionally drunk sweetened. .....
  • Tonic Brews Herbal teas to revive
    151.
  • Peppermint tea is advised for instant brain recovery and to relieve stomach discomfort.
  • Nettle tea helps maintain strong bones and is an antioxidant.
  • Lemon balm tea refreshes in summer heat and stimulates brain and memory.
  • Ginger tea gives instant zing and keeps joints mobile and circulation moving. Grate 1 in (2.5 cm) fresh ginger into a cup, pour over boiling water and steep for 10 minutes; sweeten with honey. .....
  • Tonic Brews Herbal teas to calm
    152.
  • Camomile tea is a natural sedative that brings relief for the digestion and stress headaches.
  • Fennel tea is soothing for the digestive system.
  • Elderflower tea calms symptoms in the hay-fever season. .....
  • Tonic Brews Go for good coffee
    153. Caffeine has given coffee a bad name, but research at Harvard Medical School suggests that drinking coffee in moderation lowers risk of type 2 diabetes. It also seems to enhance brain function, reduce risk of Parkinson’s, and may protect against colon cancer. However, more than three cups a day is associated in older women with loss of bone density. Aim to enjoy one really good cup of well-brewed fresh coffee rather than several cups of mediocre instant. .....
    Tonic Brews Don’t take out toxins
    154. When buying coffee to go, avoid coffee shops that serve hot drinks in polystyrene cups, which might allow seepage of the toxins benzene and styrene into food. .....
    Tonic Brews Demand cocoa
    155. Act elderly and demand to be served cocoa in bed. A cup of cocoa made with hot water contains twice as many protective antioxidant polyphenols as a glass of red wine; three times as many as a cup of green tea; and five times as many as black tea, suggests a study from Cornell University. There are concurrent benefits for heart health, circulation and glucose metabolizing. A Dutch study suggests older men who drink cocoa have lower blood pressure and may live longer than those who don’t. Drink in moderation, using cocoa powder and a little sugar to taste, rather than using hot chocolate mixes, which can be high in additives and trans-fatty acids implicated in risk of heart disease. The benefits of drinking cocoa made with hot milk have not been assessed. .....
    Age defying Alcohol
    156. A little alcohol, especially red wine, seems to play an important role in keeping the body and brain feeling and acting youthful. Drinking one or two small glasses a day is associated with substantially lowered risk of coronary heart disease and Alzheimer’s, as well as boosting immunity and reducing the risk of stroke. .....
    Age defying Alcohol Tips for the party season
    157. For times of the year when you simply must overindulge, try these:
  • Eat before a night on the town.
  • Match each alcoholic drink with a glass of water.
  • Stick to one type of drink.
  • Beware of cocktails and premixed drinks: fruit flavoring and sweetness disguise alcoholic content.
  • Don’t allow your glass to be refilled until it’s empty. .....
  • Age defying Alcohol Avoid bingeing
    158. Reserving the recommended number of units of alcohol for one weekly or monthly drinking session wipes out the benefits of a daily glass of wine. When bingeing becomes regular, it makes more likely some ailments associated with aging, from cardiovascular disease, stroke, and liver or kidney damage to breast cancer and osteoporosis. .....
    Age defying Alcohol Red wine benefits
    159. Drinking a glass of red wine a day seems to have remarkable health effects, protecting the aging heart and even guarding against gum disease suggests a recent study, thanks to the presence of impressive amounts of antioxidant phenols, which thin the blood and keep artery walls clear. Spanish studies found people who enjoyed two or more glasses a day suffered 44 percent fewer colds than those who did not indulge. .....
    Age defying Alcohol Red or white
    160. Although white wine has health benefits, red wine seems to be more useful in the antiaging armory. If you are trying to keep your weight down, be aware that a standard glass of sweet white wine contains almost 120 calories, compared to, on average, 85 in a glass of red wine. .....
    Age defying Alcohol Try organic wine
    161. Sample organic wines for their lower levels of sulfites. Many people who drink organic wine report fewer allergic reactions and a less fuzzy hangover. Look for Demeter-labeled biodynamic wines. .....
    Age defying Alcohol Beer benefits
    162. A daily glass of beer reduces risk of contracting heart disease and cataracts by 50 percent according to a Canadian study, since beer, like red wine, contains antioxidant phenols. Choose dark beers, such as ale or Guinness, which contain almost double the antioxidants of lager, or you might like to try German hemp beer. .....
    Age defying Alcohol Don’t overdo it
    163. Be aware that imbibing more than two glasses of wine every day of the week may make the complexion look older. An overtaxed liver can’t function well enough to maintain healthy-looking skin tone and texture. Also, heavy drinking increases production of damaging free radicals while depleting antioxidant vitamins essential to skin health. .....
    Age defying Alcohol Alcohol free days
    164. Build nondrinking days into your week: two or three alcohol-free days give the liver time to recover. Anticipation can make a glass of wine taste all the more delicious. .....
    Age defying Alcohol Drink with meals
    165. For optimum effects drink alcohol like the Mediterraneans, sipping a glass or two of wine with a meal. Drinking after your evening meal, especially after 10 p.m., when alcohol is metabolized less quickly, may interfere with clear thinking and the ability to make judgments, and can make deep sleep more elusive, being associated with night waking. Interrupted sleep is visible on the face as well as in lowered energy levels and memory skills. .....
    Age defying Alcohol Make your own
    166. fruit punch Apples, the basis of this warming festive punch, are valuable antiaging agents. Make the recipe using organic farmhouse cider for reduced amounts of sulfur dioxide and no artificial sweeteners. Makes enough for six glasses.
  • 2 pints (1 liter) cider
  • 8 cloves
  • 2 in (5 cm) piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • 4 russet apples, cored and sliced
  • 2 unwaxed oranges, sliced
    Place the cider in a large pan with the cloves, chopped ginger, apple, and orange slices. Bring to a simmer (but do not allow to boil). Ladle into heatproof glasses. .....
  • Age defying Alcohol Post holiday liver detox
    167. After a period of overindulgence, take a two-week alcohol break, drinking nettle tea to support the kidneys and liver and for a mineral boost. Try a supplement of milk thistle the active ingredient silymarin not only helps the liver clear alcohol from the body, it is also rich in antioxidants. Consult a herbalist or take 80-200 mg, 1-3 times daily. (Consult your doctor if you are on medication, pregnant, or using oral contraception.) .....
    Beating Cravings
    168. No matter how good the intentions, it can be difficult to overpower cravings for junk food and unhealthy drinks. Some of these natural approaches may help. When you do give in, forgive yourself: if you are eating a diet based around fruit and vegetables and drinking lots of water, the occasional lapse is no cause for concern. .....
    Beating Cravings Keep a food diary
    169. If some foods you crave don’t leave you feeling too good, you may have an intolerance to them. Before visiting a doctor or nutritionist, keep a record of everything you eat or drink and your reactions to them for at least three days. Some foods are well known for causing reactions, so pay attention if symptoms such as bloating, headaches, fatigue, or mood swings occur when you eat or drink dairy foods, wheat, citrus fruit, tomatoes, eggs, sugar, or caffeine. .....
    Beating Cravings Changing habits
    170. To banish something from your diet, ban it from the house. You can’t eat what isn’t there. Enlist your family in your campaign to cut back on cookies and chips by removing those foods from family meals and snack times. Go to the supermarket without the kids to avoid pester power. If it helps to take things slowly, banish problem foods from your home, but not entirely from your life yet by eating them only at friends’ homes or in restaurants. .....
    Beating Cravings Switch chocolate treats
    171. If chocolate is your destressing treat, switch from milk chocolate to cocoa-rich dark versions (look for those with 70 percent or more cocoa solids). You’ll find you need to eat less to feel the positive effects. .....
    Beating Cravings Enlisting help
    172. Urge friends to text you uplifting messages randomly during the day. Your phone might just buzz as you are opening the fridge. Ask girlfriends to show up not with a tempting cake, but with some exotic fruit or flowers instead. If they don’t take the hint, invent a convenient allergy—wheat bloats you, sugar brings you out in hives… .....
    Beating Cravings Shop sated
    173. Visit the supermarket on a full stomach, and take a list—both strategies help counter impulsebuying and stop you from reaching for less healthy options with eye appeal, such as greasy pastries and fat-laden snacks. Shopping online from a saved list also helps you hold out against bad impulse buys. .....
    Beating Cravings Herbal help
    174. Herbalists recommend taking the herb kudzu to help eliminate cravings. In one study it seemed to repress the urge to binge drink. Ingredients in the herb are known to lower blood pressure, and may also increase blood flow to the brain. Kudzu contains estrogenlike isoflavones, which may be helpful in menopause. Consult a herbalist, a practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine, or take 30–120 mg two or three times a day. .....
    Beating Cravings Feel good alternative
    175. Try a quick breathing exercise when willpower wanes. Close your eyes and cut out thoughts and external pressure by noticing your breath move in and out. When your breathing pattern feels calmer, imagine exhaling toxins and negative thoughts with every outbreath. On each in-breath imagine your body being energized by cleansing oxygen that brings with it a new lease of life. .....
    Beating Cravings Aromatherapy fix
    176. Place 2 drops of essential oil of grapefruit on a handkerchief. Inhale when you need a deterrent at the candy counter. The Institute of Aromatherapy in Toronto suggests this curbs cravings for sweet treats. .....
    Beating Cravings Set short term goals
    177. Take things one day at a time, focusing on getting through the next 24 hours (or if this seems overwhelming, then opt for the next hour) without succumbing to food temptations. Whenever worries about tomorrow or next month come to mind, bat them away and return to thinking about today. .....
    Beating Cravings Treats matter
    178. Reward yourself with a small treat for sticking to a healthy diet, such as a new lipstick or book, a plant for the garden, or extra minutes in bed. To keep momentum going, build up to a big pat on the back, maybe a shoe-shopping session, or a visit to a day spa. .....
    Beating Cravings Avoid temptation
    179. Remove easy temptation from your daily routine. Change your route to work if you can’t pass the corner store without buying chips. If you usually binge on cocktails at a girlfriend’s house, invite her out to a movie instead. .....
    Beating Cravings Healthy pick me ups
    180. Try one or more of the following, which not only taste great and are something of a foodie treat, but also contain valuable amounts of nutrients and health-enriching plant substances: a handful of collagenrich cherries; specialty varieties of apple (some taste like champagne); fresh or dried figs, which are loaded with minerals including calcium; antioxidant red guava. .....
    Beating Cravings Visualization
    181. When reaching for a snack bar, imagine your arteries furring up, your skin becoming more sallow and fleshy, your brain finding it harder to make connections. Then picture a shower of tropical rain pounding on your scalp, washing away these pictures. Sense a feeling of vibrancy and cleanliness inside and out. .....
    Beating Cravings Affirmations
    182. Repeating motivational phrases helps reset your default. Persevere even if it makes you feel silly. Find a phrase that instills self-confidence and a sense of purpose, such as, “I am in control” or “I love food that’s good for me.” Repeat your phrase on waking and go to sleep with it echoing in your head. .....
    When to Supplement
    183. Many people choose to fight the war against aging free radicals by eating foods containing antioxidants, and by taking supplements, which contain larger doses of nutrients and plant compounds than are available from a regular diet. Consult a nutritional therapist to find out which supplements might suit you. If you are pregnant or taking medication, consult your doctor before using any. .....
    When to Supplement Supplements vs
    184. food sources Eat a variety of vitamin-rich foods rather than relying totally on vitamin and mineral supplements for cancer protection, suggests the US Department of Health. In some studies, patients taking supplements don’t see the health benefits of those ingesting the same nutrients through food. This may be because of the synergistic reactions that take place when plant ingredients combine, setting up healing processes not yet understood by science. .....
    When to Supplement Beware very high doses
    185. Be wary of taking higher doses of antioxidants than recommended. In some cases they can act as pro-oxidants, which can damage the body. One advantage of getting nutrients directly from food sources is that it’s almost impossible to overdose on them. .....
    When to Supplement Support the heart
    186. Co-enzyme Q10 keeps all parts of the body working well, and is essential for generating energy and for muscle function and stamina, but it declines in the body and is less easily absorbed after our 20s. An antioxidant, it may help treat heart disease and lower high blood pressure, and seems to have an anticancer action. It is also prescribed to prevent age-related memory loss and boost immunity. Food sources include sardines, peanuts, and spinach, or take 50 mg daily with food (consult your doctor if taking heart or blood-pressure medication). .....
    When to Supplement Improve brainpower
    187. The herb Ginkgo biloba has antioxidant properties and by promoting the tone and elasticity of blood vessels boosts circulation to the body’s peripheries, including the brain. This has been linked in studies with modest improvements in memory in people with Alzheimer’s, and with easing depression and anxiety in older people. Take 120 mg daily (consult your doctor if taking blood-thinning or blood-pressure medication, insulin, or antidepressants). .....
    When to Supplement Keep joints mobile
    188. The source of the healing power of evening primrose oil is its constituent omega-6 essential fatty acid GLA (gamma-linoleic acid), which the body converts into inflammation-controlling prostaglandins. The body converts dietary fat into GLA less efficiently as we age, making supplements popular. Taking evening primrose oil can lessen joint pain and swelling in rheumatoid arthritis, has the added advantage of keeping skin, hair, and nails looking youthful and may be useful in keeping memory strong by boosting the transmission of nerve impulses. Take 1,000 mg with food up to three times a day. .....
    When to Supplement Build bones
    189. Vital for energy production, metabolism, digestion, and bone health, calcium-rich food and supplements reduce risk of bone loss and fracture, lower blood pressure, and keep the heart and blood vessels healthy. Calcium also protects against colon cancer, insomnia, and migraines. Food sources include dairy foods, oily fish (eat the bones), eggs, nuts, sunflower and sesame seeds, dried figs, and green leafy vegetables. Organic food has more calcium. Soak up the sun for 15 minutes daily to generate vitamin D, which is essential for calcium uptake, as is magnesium, available from nuts, whole grains, and yeast extract. To ensure your intake is high enough take 1,000 mg calcium a day to age 50, 1,200 mg if you are over 50. .....
    When to Supplement Boost energy
    190. The amino acid L-carnitine, which helps the body make energy, is not available in large amounts in food, although it is found in meat, dairy produce, and spinach. Studies suggest that taking 250–1,000 mg daily can boost energy and endurance levels, help with age-related memory loss and also support the heart. .....
    When to Supplement Universal antioxidant
    191. Nutritionists may recommend taking L-carnitine with alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), the “universal antioxidant” that boosts energy production in body cells, relieves fatigue, and increases the effectiveness of vitamins C and E. ALA seems to support healthy nerve, heart, and liver function, and may improve longterm memory and prevent cataracts. It can be found in meat, yeast extract and spinach, but not in quantity. Take 100 mg once or twice a day. .....
    When to Supplement Protect the eyes
    192. Antioxidant carotenoid pigments lutein and zeaxanthin act as nature’s sunglasses, protecting eyes from sun damage and supporting the macula, part of the retina that degenerates with age, causing gradual loss of sight. High levels of lutein and zeaxanthin seem also to boost immunity and protect against heart disease, breast and lung cancer, and age-related brain deterioration. Natural food sources are red peppers, pumpkin, carrots, sweet potatoes, and corn; dark green vegetables such as spinach, broccoli and kale. Absorption from enriched eggs may be 200–300 percent more efficient than from other food and supplements. Alternatively, take 6 mg lutein and 0.1-0.2 mg zeaxanthin daily. .....
    When to Supplement Oil the heart
    193. Most of us don’t get enough omega-3 fatty acids from food. These essential fats underpin the healthy working of many body systems. They maintain low cholesterol and reduce blood pressure protecting the heart from disease, and thin the blood reducing risk of stroke. They also decrease inflammation and joint stiffness, and seem effective for mood disorders and depression. Omega-3 fats may have anticancer powers, too. Good food sources include mackerel, tuna, salmon, herring; venison, and buffalo meat; flaxseeds (linseeds), walnuts, and hemp oil. If you are worried about contamination of fish or you think your intake is too low take a 2 g supplement daily (consult your doctor if taking blood-thinning medication). .....
    When to Supplement Fight disease
    194. Selenium is a trace element required by every body cell. It is vital in disease prevention because it helps antioxidant enzymes to function. Selenium also protects against heart attack and stroke, cataracts and macular degeneration. Taking it with vitamin E may increase its antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. Food sources include Brazil nuts, seafood, meat and poultry, cottage cheese and eggs, oats and brown rice. Vegetarians especially may benefit from a supplement of 200–400 mcg daily combined with 400 iu vitamin E (do not take more than the recommended dose). .....
    Green Essentials
    195. The kitchen is home to a number of chemicals, including pesticides and formaldehyde, that can have adverse effects on health. It’s easy to rid the home of potentially toxic household chemicals: simply clear out kitchen cupboards. .....
    Green Essentials Kitchen chemical clearout
    196. Pull out all the bottles of household cleaning fluids you can find in your house. Put to one side all those marked with the words “danger,” “caution,” “flammable,” or “combustible” these fluids contain potentially dangerous chlorine, ammonia, or solvents. Add to the reject pile bottles featuring warnings not to use in unventilated spaces and certain temperatures, violently colored products, and those that cause discomfort to eyes and nose when inhaled. For advice on safe disposal call your household waste collector, or contact a local branch of Greenpeace or Friends of the Earth. .....
    Green Essentials Dangerous surface wipes
    197. Read the ingredients list for the cleaner you use to wipe over kitchen surfaces. Chemical names including the term “chlor” indicate a chlorinated substance. Chlorine is a hazardous air pollutant and may be neurotoxic and carcinogenic to mammals. Used over food-prep areas it can leave persistent residues that may transfer to food. Ditch it now and replace with an ecocleaning fluid. .....
    Green Essentials Avoid antibacterials
    198. Adopt the example of Swedish hospitals and get rid of antimicrobial-impregnated chopping boards and sponges, sprays and hand-washing liquid. They are no more effective than soap and water and may contain biocides that accumulate in the environment and are suspected human carcinogens. .....
    Green Essentials Green cleaners
    199. Go shopping for green cleaners made from naturally derived surfactants (the main components of detergent) and biodegradable ingredients that have less impact on the environment, and so on the health of our food and water. Ecover and Seventh Generation products are efficient, or make your own. .....
    Green Essentials Nontoxic surface cleaner
    200. Mix half and half water and distilled white vinegar in a pump spray. Add a squeeze of lemon juice for scent. Spray over surfaces and wipe away. .....
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