Benefits of tamarind

Tamarind
1. Tamarind is a slow growing tropical evergreen tree native to tropical Africa, and grows in India and Mexico as well. The origins of the word tamarind mean the date of India. The mature tamarind tree can grow to 80 feet high in tropical, humid climates. It bears long brownish pods that have acidic pulp and hard seeds. Tamarind is an ingredient in many forms of Asian and Latin American drinks, dishes, snacks and candies, as well as medicines and herbal treatments. .....
Tamarind Tree
2. The Tamarind tree, is related to carob. It grows wild in its native tropical Africa, but is grown extensively in India, Costa Rica and Thailand for its fruit pods, flowers, leaves and wood. The tamarind tree grows slowly, gets very tall and lives a very long time. .....
Tamarind Fruit
3. The fruit of the tamarind tree grows in a long brown pod. It has sour fleshy brownish reddish pulp with many seeds. The fruit pulp has vitamin B and calcium and tastes fruity, sweet and sour. The fruit is used in many ways to flavor dishes, as sauce or chutney, as a souring flavoring, with sugar added as a dried fruit candy and powdered or fresh squeezed for refreshing drinks. .....
Medicinal Uses
4. Tamarind has medicinal as well as culinary uses. It is a natural mild laxative, and is eaten fresh or in dried form to relieve constipation. Steam from boiling tamarind when inhaled will bring some relief from congestion and breathing problems. Gargling with tamarind water will relieve a sore throat. Because it is very acidic, it has antiseptic properties and is used to reduce fever. .....
Recipes
5. Tamarind is used in many culinary preparations, from drinks, to sauces, jams and chutneys, to side and main dishes.A simple drink recipe for a delicious summer agua fresca de tamarindo calls for 1 lb. of tamarind pulp with seeds, 1 gallon of water and 1 cup of sugar. Put the pulp and water in a large cooking pot and bring to a boil. Cook over medium heat for 30 minutes, stirring and breaking up the pulp. Strain out the pulp and seeds, add sugar, and chill before serving with ice and garnished with orange or lemon fruit slices. .....
Tamarind in the Kitchen
6. Tamarind is a staple and a favorite in Mexican, Latin American, Indian and Asian kitchens and restaurants. It is kept as a paste for cooking and making drinks, to make a natural unprocessed candy, for folk remedies to treat mild conditions and as a fresh fruit to be enjoyed in many ways. .....
Selection and storage
7. Fresh tamarind pods are available in late spring and early summer seasons. However, several different forms of processed tamarind such as compressed tamarind blocks, ready to use slice, paste, concentrates, balls, etc. are made available in the markets. .....
Culinary uses
8. Tamarind is used as an antiseptic to heal wounds and to prevent infections from spreading in the body. .....
Bilious disorders
9. Tamarind is an effective cure for bilious disorders. it plays an indirect yet very important role in controlling the cholesterol levels in the body. Dietary fibres in tamarind binds to bile salts formed from cholesterol and decrease its re absorption. This helps excrete bad cholesterol and keeps your heart healthy. .....
Malaria
10. Tamarind mixes well in herbal tea and is used for treating malaria fever. .....
Jaundice
11. A decoction of tamarind leaves is used in preparing medicinal solutions for curing jaundice and ulcers. .....
Inflammation
12. Inflammation is a very serious skin care problem and also affects a few internal organs of the body that can cause a great deal of discomfort and even pain for some. Tamarind is a good medicine for treating inflammation of the skin. .....
Cancer
13. Tamarind is a good source of antioxidants and helps in curbing the growth of cancerous products in the body by preventing free radicals from being formed which conduct unwanted reactions in the body. .....
Laxative
14. Tamarind pulp is used as a mild laxative. This impacts the sluggishness of the bowels and a few spoonfuls of the pulp can improve bowel movements considerably. .....
Piles
15. Tamarind juice, extracted from its flowers is used in the treatment of piles. .....
Blood purification
16. Tamarind in general participates in the purification of blood, and hence including it in daily meals is extremely beneficial. .....
Health benefits and medicinal uses of tamarind
17. It s not just the fruit of tamarind that offers health benefits. Combinations of herbs and spices mixed with tamarind powders are used by herbalists and ayurvedic practitioners for various natural treatments. Fruit, leaves, seeds, bark, flowers and pulp of tamarind have been used in several ancient cultures and by medieval herbalists. Listed below are the numerous health benefits and medicinal uses of tamarind. .....
Pulp of tamarind acts
18. Pulp of tamarind acts as a laxative and is an excellent remedy for sluggish bowel movement. The presence of dietary fiber in tamarind pulp plays an important role on binding bile salts. Two teaspoons of tamarind paste is very good for bowel movement. .....
Leaves of tamarind
19. Leaves of tamarind are used in herbal tea decoctions. Medicinal teas that contain extracts of tamarind leaves are given to individuals suffering from fever and chills. .....
Diluted tamarind paste
20. Diluted tamarind paste is an excellent home remedy for sore throat. A person with throat infection can gargle diluted lukewarm tamarind water for relief. .....
Mouth ulcers
21. Tamarind pulp with a mix of crushed herbs such as coriander and mint is an excellent treatment for mouth ulcers. Tamarind has a cooling effect on ulcers caused by hot and spicy foods. .....
Varieties
22. In some regions the type with reddish flesh is distinguished from the ordinary brown fleshed type and regarded as superior in quality. There are types of tamarinds that are sweeter than most. One in Thailand is known as 'Makham waan'. One distributed by the United States Department of Agriculture's Subtropical Horticulture Research Unit, Miami, is known as 'Manila Sweet'. .....
Climate
23. Very young trees should be protected from cold but older trees are surprisingly hardy. Wilson Popenoe wrote that a large tree was killed on the west coast of Florida (about 7.5? lat. N) by a freeze in 1884. However, no cold damage was noted in South Florida following the low temperatures of the winter of 1957-1958 which had severe effects on many mango, avocado, lychee and lime trees. Dr. Henry Nehrling reported that a tamarind tree in his garden at Gotha, Florida, though damaged by freezes, always sprouted out again from the roots. In northwestern India, the tree grows well but the fruits do not ripen. Dry weather is important during the period of fruit development. In South Malaya, where there are frequent rains at this time, the tamarind does not bear. .....
Soil
24. The tree tolerates a great diversity of soil types, from deep alluvial soil to rocky land and porous, oolitic limestone. It withstands salt spray and can be planted fairly close to the seashore. .....
Propagation
25. Tamarind seeds remain viable for months, will germinate in a week after planting. In the past, propagation has been customarily by seed sown in position, with thorny branches protecting the young seedlings. However, today, young trees are usually grown in nurseries. And there is intensified interest in vegetative propagation of selected varieties because of the commercial potential of tamarind products. The tree can be grown easily from cuttings, or by shield budding, side veneer grafting, or air layering. .....
Culture
26. Nursery grown trees are usually transplanted during the early rainy season. If kept until the second rainy season, the plants must be cut back and the taproot trimmed. Spacing may be 33 to 65 ft (10 20 m) between trees each way, depending on the fertility of the soil. With sufficient water and regular weeding, the seedlings will reach 2 ft (60 cm) the first year and 4 ft (120 cm) by the second year. .....
Season
27. Mexican studies reveal that the fruits begin to dehydrate 203 days after fruit set, losing approximately 1/2 moisture up to the stage of full ripeness, about 245 days from fruit set. In Florida, Central America, and the West Indies, the flowers appear in summer, the green fruits are found in December and January and ripening takes place from April through June. In Hawaii the fruits ripen in late summer and fall. .....
Harvesting
28. Tamarinds may be left on the tree for as long as 6 months after maturity so that the moisture content will be reduced to 20% or lower. Fruits for immediate processing are often harvested by pulling the pod away from the stalk which is left with the long, longitudinal fibers attached. In India, harvesters may merely shake the branches to cause mature fruits to fall and they leave the remainder to fall naturally when ripe. Pickers are not allowed to knock the fruits off with poles as this would damage developing leaves and flowers. To keep the fruit intact for marketing fresh, the stalks must be clipped from the branches so as not to damage the shell. .....
Yield
29. A mature tree may annually produce 330 to 500 lbs (150-225 kg) of fruits, of which the pulp may constitute 30 to 55%, the shells and fiber, 11 to 30 %, and the seeds, 33 to 40%. .....
Keeping Quality
30. To preserve tamarinds for future use, they may be merely shelled, layered with sugar in boxes or pressed into tight balls and covered with cloth and kept in a cool, dry place. For shipment to processors, tamarinds may be shelled, layered with sugar in barrels and covered with boiling sirup. East Indians shell the fruits and sprinkle them lightly with salt as a preservative. In Java, the salted pulp is rolled into balls, steamed and sun dried, then exposed to dew for a week before being packed in stone jars. In India, the pulp, with or without seeds and fibers may be mixed with salt (10%), pounded into blocks, wrapped in palmleaf matting, and packed in burlap sacks for marketing. To store for long periods, the blocks of pulp may be first steamed or sun dried for several days. .....
Pests and Diseases
31. One of the major pests of the tamarind tree in India is the Oriental yellow scale, Aonidiella orientalis. Tamarind scale, A. tamarindi, and black, or olive, scale, Saissetia oleae, are also partial to tamarind but of less importance. Butani (1970) lists 8 other scale species that may be found on the tree, the young and adults sucking the sap of buds and flowers and accordingly reducing the crop. .....
Food Uses
32. The food uses of the tamarind are many. The tender, immature, very sour pods are cooked as seasoning with rice, fish and meats in India. The fully grown, but still unripe fruits, called swells in the Bahamas, are roasted in coals until they burst and the skin is then peeled back and the sizzling pulp dipped in wood ashes and eaten. The fully ripe, fresh fruit is relished out of hand by children and adults, alike.The pulp is made into a variety of products. It is an important ingredient in chutneys, curries and sauces, including some brands of Worcestershire and barbecue sauce, and in a special Indian seafood pickle called tamarind fish . Sugared tamarind pulp is often prepared as a confection. For this purpose, it is desirable to separate the pulp from the seeds without using water.Tamarind ade has long been a popular drink in the Tropics and it is now bottled in carbonated form in Guatemala, Mexico, Puerto Rico and elsewhere. .....
Fruit pulp
33. The fruit pulp may be used as a fixative with turmeric or annatto in dyeing and has served to coagulate rubber latex. The pulp, mixed with sea water, cleans silver, copper and brass. .....
Leaves
34. Tamarind leaves and flowers are useful as mordants in dyeing. A yellow dye derived from the leaves colors wool red and turns indigo dyed silk to green. Tamarind leaves in boiling water are employed to bleach the leaves of the buri palm (Corypha elata Roxb.) to prepare them for hat making. The foliage is a common mulch for tobacco plantings. .....
Flowers
35. The flowers are rated as a good source of nectar for honeybees in South India. The honey is golden yellow and slightly acid in flavor. .....
Seeds
36. Tamarind seeds yield an amber oil useful as an illuminant and as a varnish especially preferred for painting dolls and idols. The oil is said to be palatable and of culinary quality. The tannin rich seedcoat (testa) is under investigation as having some utility as an adhesive for plywoods and in dyeing and tanning, though it is of inferior quality and gives a red hue to leather.The powder made from tamarind kernels has been adopted by the Indian textile industry as 300% more efficient and more economical than cornstarch for sizing and finishing cotton, jute and spun viscose, as well as having other technical advantages. It is commonly used for dressing homemade blankets. Other industrial uses include employment in color printing of textiles, paper sizing, leather treating, the manufacture of a structural plastic, a glue for wood, a stabilizer in bricks, a binder in sawdust briquettes, and a thickener in some explosives. .....
Wood
37. The sapwood of the tamarind tree is pale yellow. The heartwood is rather small, dark purplish brown, very hard, heavy, strong, durable and insect resistant. It bends well and takes a good polish and, while hard to work, it is highly prized for furniture, panelling, wheels, axles, gears for mills, ploughs, planking for sides of boats, wells, mallets, knife and tool handles, rice pounders, mortars and pestles. It has at times been sold as Madeira mahogany . Wide boards are rare, despite the trunk dimensions of old trees, since they tend to become hollow centered. The wood is valued for fuel, especially for brick kilns, for it gives off an intense heat, and it also yields a charcoal for the manufacture of gun powder. In Malaysia, even though the trees are seldom felled, they are frequently topped to obtain firewood. The wood ashes are employed in tanning and in de hairing goatskins. Young stems and also slender roots of the tamarind tree are fashioned into walking sticks. .....
Twigs and barks
38. Tamarind twigs are sometimes used as chewsticks and the bark of the tree as a masticatory, alone or in place of lime with betelnut. The bark contains up to 7% tannin and is often employed in tanning hides and in dyeing, and is burned to make an ink. Bark from young trees yields a low quality fiber used for twine and string. Galls on the young branches are used in tanning. .....
Lac
39. The tamarind tree is a host for the lac insect, Kerria lacca, that deposits a resin on the twigs. The lac may be harvested and sold as stick lac for the production of lacquers and varnish. If it is not seen as a useful byproduct, tamarind growers trim off the resinous twigs and discard them. .....
Superstitions
40. Few plants will survive beneath a tamarind tree and there is a superstition that it is harmful to sleep or to tie a horse beneath one, probably because of the corrosive effect that fallen leaves have on fabrics in damp weather. Some African tribes venerate the tamarind tree as sacred. To certain Burmese, the tree represents the dwelling place of the rain god and some hold the belief that the tree raises the temperature in its immediate vicinity. Hindus may marry a tamarind tree to a mango tree before eating the fruits of the latter. In Nyasaland, tamarind bark soaked with corn is given to domestic fowl in the belief that, if they stray or are stolen, it will cause them to return home. In Malaya, a little tamarind and coconut milk is placed in the mouth of an infant at birth, and the bark and fruit are given to elephants to make them wise. .....
Antiseptic
41. Tamarind is used as an antiseptic to heal wounds and to prevent infections from spreading in the body. .....
Diabetics
42. Paste of tamarind is excellent for diabetics. It is used as traditional medicine along with jamun and herbs for diabetes control. Pulp of this fruit helps lower glucose levels that tend to rise after meals. .....
Reduce swelling of joints
43. Paste made from leaves of tamarind can be applied on areas of the body to reduce swelling of joints. This paste provides much needed relief for arthritis sufferers that are not able to move their hands, legs or shoulders because of joint pain. Paste of seeds can also be used to treat boils and sprains. .....
Tamarind Fruits
44. Tamarind Fruit is brown pool like legume and contains soft, acidic pulp and many hard coat seeds. Seeds can be scarified to enhance germination. Young fruit has hard, green pulp which is sour and acidic and used as component of salivary dishes. Ripened fruit is sweet and used in desserts, drinks,and snacks. .....
Sweet Tamarind vs Sour Tamarind
45. Sweet and tangy tamarind is one of the widely used condiment spices found in every South Asian kitchen .....
Malabar Tamarind
46. Tamarind has been reported to be native to India. It is a much valued food ingredient in many Asian and Latin American recipes. The sour and fruity taste of Tamarind merges well with the heat of chilies and gives South Indian dishes their hot and sour character and their dark colour. .....
Vitamin or Supplement Tamarind
47. People take tamarind for constipation, liver and gallbladder problems, and stomach disorders. It is also used to treat colds and fever. Women sometimes use tamarind to treat pregnancy related nausea. It is given to children to treat intestinal worms.Sometimes a thick paste of tamarind seeds is used as a cast for broken bones. .....
Tamarind Nutrition Facts
48. Tamarindus Indica, tamarind is found to be an excellent source of vitamins and minerals. Nevertheless, while tamarind may be good for you, it is equally important to know tamarind s pros and cons. The tamarind tree is cultivated in the tropical belts of Asia and Africa for the nutritious pulp and juice extracted from the pod. Apart from the use of tamarind pulp in food preparation, indigenous medical practitioners also use the benefits of tamarind, its leaves, fruit, juice, paste, and flowers to treat various digestive disorders. .....
Tamarind benefits extend to our skin
49. Tamarind leaves can be used effectively to cure burns. Put the leaves in a pot, cover them, and warm them over the fire. Leaves that get burnt are powdered finely and sieved to get rid of any gritty particles. This powder is then mixed with some gingelly oil and thinly spread over the area that is burnt. While tamarind helps heal the wound, the oil ensures that the affected part gets protection from moisture and also ensures that harmful germs do not enter the wound. Tamarind leaves are also beneficial in preventing edema. In general, benefits of tamarind include a healthy and glowing skin. .....
Tamarind s side effects
50. Consuming tamarind increases the amount of aspirin or ibuprofen absorbed by the body, and therefore, the side effects of aspirin use may be manifested. Tamarind disadvantages may include higher acidity in those who have digestive problems associated with acid reflux. .....
Nutritional Facts of Tamarind
51. Tamarind is such a valuable commodity in the world because of its many nutritional components that add to its healthy impact. These include a significant level of vitamin C, as well as vitamin E, B vitamins, calcium, iron, phosphorous, potassium, manganese, and dietary fiber. There are also a number of organic compounds that make tamarind a powerful antioxidant and anti inflammatory agent. The health benefits of tamarind are explained in greater detail below. .....
Digestive Health
52. Tamarind has long been considered a natural laxative, and its dietary fiber content probably has something to do with it. Eating tamarind as a fruit or as a spice can increase the efficiency of your digestive system, while the fiber can bulk up your stool, making it move through the smooth muscles of the intestinal tract easier. Tamarind is also a bilious substance, meaning that stimulates the activity of bile, which can help dissolve food faster, and the fiber also stimulates gastric juices to speed up digestion. .....
Heart Health
53. Tamarind have shown it to be effective in reducing blood pressure and blood cholesterol. The fiber content in tamarind certainly has something to do with the reduction in cholesterol, since it is known to scrap excess LDL cholesterol from the veins and arteries. The potassium in tamarind may be responsible for the reduction in blood pressure, since it is known as a vasodilator that reduces the stress on the cardiovascular system. The impressive level of vitamin C in tamarind also may have something to do with it as well, since vitamin C is an antioxidant compound that can reduce the impact of free radicals, those pesky byproducts of cellular metabolism that have been linked to heart disease and a number of other health conditions. .....
Circulation
54. Tamarind is a very good source of iron, and a single serving can provide more than 10% of your daily requirement. A healthy supply of iron in the body guarantees the proper red blood cell count in the body, which can ensure appropriate oxygenation of different muscles and organs that need oxygen to function properly. Also, iron deficiency results in anemia, which is characterized by weakness, fatigue, headaches, cognitive disorders, and stomach issues. .....
Nerve Function
55. One of the most significant vitamin elements of tamarind is the B complex. Thiamine, one of the most important parts of that vitamin family, is found in high quantities within tamarind. Thiamine is responsible for improving nerve function, as well as muscle development, which can help you remain active, maintain your reflexive, and stay strong. .....
Weight Loss
56. One of the unique compounds that can be extracted from tamarinds or gained as a benefit from it when used as a spice is called hydroxycitric acid (HCA). HCA is connected to weight loss because it has been shown to inhibit an enzyme in the body that specifically helps store fat. Furthermore, tamarind has been known to suppress the appetite by increasing the serotonin neurotransmitter. Research is still ongoing in these respective areas, but it shows promising signs as a weight loss supplement! .....
Manage Diabetes
57. Along with its ability to stop weight gain, inhibiting that enzyme, alpha amylase mainly stops carbohydrates from being absorbed, which are easily converted to simple sugars or fats. A carbohydrate heavy diet can increase the chances of uncontrolled glucose and insulin levels, which is the biggest problems for people suffering from diabetes. Tamarind can help monitor and control these fluctuations. .....
Anti Inflammatory Capacity
58. The essential oils of tamarind have been connected to a number of anti inflammatory abilities, including the reduction of joint pain and inflammation, arthritis, rheumatic conditions, and gout. It also reduces eye irritation. One of the most common forms of this is conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye. Tamarind has shown a definite soothing and anti inflammatory ability, and is therefore used in many herbal remedies for inflammation. .....
Immune System
59. High levels of vitamin C, as well as other antioxidant effects in the essential oils make tamarind a wonderful way to boost your immune system and ensure long term health from microbial and fungal infections. It also reduces the occurrence of parasites in the body due to its antiseptic and antimicrobial effects. It has specifically been linked to eliminating stomach worms in children in tropical areas where tamarind in cultivated. .....
A Few Words of Caution
60. The main concern is that tamarind lowers blood pressure and is a blood thinner, so it can be difficult to reduce bleeding in case something happens. If you are taking aspiring or other blood thinners, be careful if you ingest an excessive amount of tamarind. .....
Carbohydrates
61. Tamarind is still a source of carbohydrates, and it must be limited and factored into a well balanced diet. It is best eaten plain in small amounts or used as a condiment to spruce up the flavor of food and beverages.This food is an excellent source of vitamin B, vitamin C, potassium, magnesium, iron, thiamine, phosphorus, riboflavin, and fiber. .....
Simple Recipe for Tamarind
62. The simplest way to enjoy tamarind is in the pod form. Break off the brown outer pod and remove the stringy part that looks like a small root wrapped around the pulp. You will be left with a long piece of pulp that has rock hard seeds inside the size of large corn niblets. Cut it into sections and eat, nibble around the seeds and spit them out. Keep in mind too much tamarind can have a laxative effect. .....
Date and Tamarind Chutney
63. This one of my favourite dipping sauces. Sweet and sour in flavour this condiment usually accompanies samosas, cassava chips and many types of 'chaat'. You can adjust the amount of dates, tamarind and jaggery to make it as sweet or sour as you like. Think of it as the Indian version of a ketchup. .....
Herbal Soap and Facial Scrub from natural AHAs
64. All our products at Body Delights are made of natural AHAs from the tamarind tree. You can enjoy the positive benefits on a daily basis with the Tamarind Herbal Soap. This product can fade dark spots, age spots, and post acne scarring while assisting in softening your facial skin tone. Or try our Tamarind and Honey Herbal Body Scrub or Tamarind Extract Herbal Foam Facial Scrub which are specially formulated to improve the overall condition of your skin to produce a healthy glow.These products will leave your skin feeling healthy and clean.You can also have your own body delight and tamarind spa and try the homemade tamarind scrub recipe, a simple but efficient recipe for a homemade tamarind face mask. .....
Instant lightening pack
65. You cannot use raw tamarind as it may irritate your skin. So we firstly boil around 30 grams of tamarind in 100 ml of water. After a few minutes, remove it from the flame, cool it and extract the pulp from it. .....
Instant bleaching
66. This homemade tamarind face mask contains all the natural bleaching agents. It is useful for removing acne scars, dark patches and pigmentation. Tamarind also helps to lighten skin tone. .....
Body scrub and Face scrub
67. This body scrub is ideal for oily and acne prone skin due the antimicrobial properties of tamarind. But avoid the contact with eyes and skin and do not apply after shaving or waxing as it may irritate your skin.Tamarind contains natural fruit acids which help to remove impurities and dead cells giving a polished skin. It also contains AHA (alpha hydroxy acids) which acts as an exfoliater. .....
Hydrating toner
68. We all are familiar with the hydrating properties of tea. Green and black tea contains anti ageing elements which help to fight against the formation of free radicals. It also reduces fine lines and wrinkles. Tamarind also makes your face radiant and smooth. .....
Cooking
69. Tamarind juice is widely used in many states of India for making curries, salad dressing,You can also make a fresh drink by mixing sugar and tamarind juice with 2 cups of cold water and lemon wedges.You cav Prepare a salad dressing out of tamarind, lemon juice, sugar and olive oil. .....
Improved Blood Sugar and Appetite Control
70. American pharmaceutical companies use 100 tons of tamarind pulp yearly for use in blood sugar managing medications, according to Phytopharmacology and Therapeutic Values. One tablespoon of tamarind paste provides 12 percent of adults' daily recommended intake of fiber an indigestible carbohydrate that promotes blood sugar and appetite control. .....
Precautions
71. Although tamarind is recognized as generally safe, according to HealthLine.com, tamarind seed powder has been linked with coughing. Overexposure to tamarind flour could cause chronic lung problems and in rare cases, tamarind candy has caused lead poisoning a condition that can be fatal. Tamarind supplements can interact with dietary supplements and medications, such as gingko biloba, aspirin, ibuprofen and blood sugar lowering drugs. Before using tamarind for medicinal purposes, seek guidance from your doctor, particularly if you have a medical condition. .....
Blood purifier and Skin health
72. Tamarind juice is also used in cosmetics such as tamarind face mask and face scrub. This contains acids, minerals, dietary fiber and Vitamin C which is a good blood purifier.Tamarind juice is excellent for the health of your skin and to treat burns and prevent edema. Apply the juice to maintain glowing and healthy skin. This can also reduce or remove common acne or chickenpox scars from the face and other parts of the body. Tamarind juice has enzymes, fiber, Vitamin B, Vitamin C and alpha hydroxyl acids that remove dead skin cells. .....
Cooling effect and Obesity
73. This imparts a cooling effect to your body temperature. Hence, the drink is to be consumed to cure sun strokes in the tropical regions.Many people with obesity need to lose weight to maintain their body weight. Tamarind juice can be very beneficial in such cases for weight loss and for treating obesity. .....
Stomach health
74. Use of tamarind juice treats inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn s disease. Tamarind pulp juice helps to keep stomach ulcers and stomach acids at bay.Mix this with honey, milk, lemon and dates to help indigestion. They are rich sources of fiber that regulates bowel movements and cures constipation, intestinal worms and parasites in children. This is a great natural way to cure diarrhea and dysentery, and lower inflammation caused due to hemorrhoids. .....
Treatment of ulcers
75. Tamarind is acidic and excites the bile and other juices in the body. This naturally aids in digestion. It also acts as a blood purifier and is also used to treat bronchial disorders and gargling with tamarind water is recommended for a sore throat. It is an effective antiseptic, used in eye baths and for the treatment of ulcers. .....
For Liver Problems
76. Dry tamarind flowers in the shade. Powder and add equal quantity of candy sugar. Mix well and store in a tightly closed bottle. For relief from liver problems, take 5 grams of this mixture before lunch and dinner. .....
As a Cooling Drink
77. To a glass of water add 10 grams of tamarind and blend it in when soft. Strain, add sugar to taste and drink. This is an excellent cooling drink. .....
Sunstroke And Intoxication
78. Soak 50 grams of tamarind in 500 ml water for 2 hours or till the pulp turns soft. Mash it well and blend it in the water. Add sugar, candy sugar, brown sugar or jaggery as per taste and preference. Mix well, strain and drink. .....
Fluorosis
79. Drinking tamarind water destroys the fluoride ions and thereby prevents fluorosis. Adding salt to tamarind water tremendously increases the capacity of this water to remove the fluoride from the water. .....
Tamarind Seeds and Dry Eyes
80. Dry eye is a condition that may cause surface irritation, redness and periods of blurry vision. Non Medicated artificial tears may provide some relief, but, for continued comfort, you may find that you have to use these drops frequently. Some medicated drops may provide some help with dry eye, but these drops do not help everyone. .....
bowel movement
81. Pulp of tamarind acts as a laxative and is an excellent remedy for sluggish bowel movement. The presence of dietary fiber in tamarind pulp plays an important role on binding bile salts. Two teaspoons of tamarind paste is very good for bowel movement. .....
Keep the bones remain strong
82. By consuming tamarind, naturally you increase the intake of magnesium. Several studies have shown that people who consume a high potassium and magnesium have better bone density than those not. .....
Helped nervous system works well
83. If you often feel numb and the muscles are weak, possibly thiamin deficiency. The content of Vitamin B in tamarind, played a major role in the function of the body including nerve and muscle activity. .....
Helps prevent constipation
84. Tamarind is also a high source of fiber, fiber helps to overcome constipation and keep to smooth digestion. .....
Controlling blood pressure
85. Every 100 grams of tamarind contains 2 times more potassium than in bananas. Potassium helps control blood pressure by controlling the effect of sodium on the body. .....
Prevent anemia
86. With its high iron content, consuming tamarind can help you fight against anemia. .....
Controlling cholesterol levels
87. Besides thiamin, tamarind is a good source of niacin. Niacin can help lower bad cholesterol and raise levels of good cholesterol in the body. .....
Helping to produce energy
88. Riboflavin content of the tamarind will help release energy from carbohydrates. .....
Assist the process of blood clotting
89. Tamarind is a fruit that is rich in calcium. Calcium (with the help of vitamin K) has a major role in the process of blood clotting in wounds. .....
Keep the healthy teeth and gums
90. Missing teeth or bleeding gums can be a sign of lack of vitamin C in our bodies. Tamarind contains some vitamin C sufficient to meet those needs as much as 6%. .....
Strengthen the immune system
91. Among all the fruits and vegetables, tamarind is the highest source of protein. Protein can produce antibodies that help eradicate viruses and bacteria. .....
Tamarind and Constipation
92. Tamarind contains a lot of dietary fiber. Dietary fiber, though not nutritious, is very essential in our bodies. It helps in regulating bowel movements and cleansing our digestive system from various harmful and unneeded substances. Traditionally, tamarind has been used to treat stomach ailments like constipation. Tamarind juice is said to provide instant relief for people suffering from constipation. By cleaning our systems, the fiber also helps eliminate toxins from our body. .....
Tamarind seed eye drops
93. Eye drops made from tamarind seeds may be a treatment for dry eye syndrome. Tamarind seed polysaccharide is adhesive, enabling it to stick to the surface of the eye longer than other eye preparations. Tamarind seed polysaccharide is used as an ingredient in food material and in pharmaceutical products. Drs. Maurizio Rolando and Cristiana Valente from the University of Genoa, Italy had 30 dry eye sufferers use Tamarind seed polysaccharide or hyaluronic acid drops three or more times per day for 90 days. The Tamarind seed polysaccharide eye drops performed as well as the hyaluronic acid drops on several measures of dry eye syndrome. Furthermore, the Tamarind seed polysaccharide drops did a significantly better job of relieving several key subjective symptoms of dry eye syndrome namely, trouble blinking, ocular burning, and the sensation of having something in one's eye. .....
Kidney protection
94. Protective potential of Tamarindus indica against gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity.There were no differences among strains for egg production, egg weight, yolk weight, egg mass, feed consumption, or feed efficiency. Yolk weight increased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing levels of dietary tamarind in wk 1, 2, and 3 as well as when averaged over 6 wk. Egg yolk cholesterol concentrations were not affected by dietary tamarind. Serum cholesterol concentrations, however, decreased quadratically with increasing levels of dietary tamarind. It was concluded that 2% supplemental dietary tamarind could decrease serum cholesterol concentrations and increase layer performance. .....
Tamarind is available in an assortment of snacks
95. People in this part of the world dry the tamarind fruit with salt or preserve it as candies .....
Habitat and cultivation
96. The tamarind tree is considered to be one of the earliest cultivated plants of unknown or obscure taxonomic origin. Many are of the opinion that the tamarind tree is native to tropical Africa from where the plant spread to other temperate regions of the globe. The tamarind tree is primarily cultivated for its fruit pulp and also its value as an ornamental tree. While the pulp is edible and has numerous remedial properties, the tree itself is magnificent and is grown in public parks, vast landscapes as well as along the avenues for adorning these locales. .....
Constituents
97. The chemical composition of the tamarind pulp comprises rich content of pectin, monosaccharides and organic acids, primarily potassium hydrogen tartrate. In addition, other organic acids, such as free acids, including tartaric acid, citric acid and malic acid are also present in the tamarind fruit pulp. Acids comprise almost 12 per cent to 15 per cent of the tamarind pulp. Tamarind has an exclusive fragrance and this is attributed to the presence of pyrazinen and thiazols as well as an essential oil in the pulp. The essential oil found in the tamarind fruit pulp is in low concentration and contains monoterpenoids and aromatic cinnamates. .....
Usual dosage
98. Tamarind pulp is said to be an effective remedy for constipation. Hence, dehydrated pulp of the tamarind fruits are blended with commercially available constipation medications or the pulp is consumed fresh to treat this condition. .....
Govardhan Puja Celebration
Why Govardhan Pooja is Celebrated Significance. A great mountain of the food, called the Govardhan Mountain, is adorned by the people at this occasion. It is considered that the Govardhan Mountain was lifted by the Lord Krishna in order to save the life of people from the arrogant Indra. Lord Indr .....
Exchanging Christmas Gifts
Do a Yankee Swap White Elephant. Stealing from other participants gives this gift exchange game an element of unpredictability. Invite everyone to contribute a wrapped gift (a new item if youre following Yankee Swap rules; a used one if youre doing White Elephant). Draw numbers out .....
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